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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem was posted on Twitter by Mikhail Golubev.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

“an easy chess puzzle”

“mate in three – from my internet blitz game”

13

posted on Twitter, diagram as above, November 29th 2018

 

Solution

After failing to make 1…Rb1+; 1…Qe3+; and many other tries work, in what was obviously a Sicilian Dragon by Golubev; and even knowing that it had to be check, check, mate because White can check and avoid a mate in three; I paused for a moment to look at White’s threats:

1 Qf7+! Kf7 (1…Kh8 2 Qe8+ and 3 Qf8 mate) 2 Bd5++ Ke8 3 Bc8 mate.

It is mate in three, but for White.

14

A trick by Mikhail Golubev; one where the smile exceeded the annoyance.

FEN

6k1/4ppbp/p1n3p1/4q3/2Q5/P3PB1P/1rP3P1/2KR1R2 b – – 0 1

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

11

Ekburg v Martius, Copenhagen 1962

 

Solution

1 Nb8+ Kc7 2 Ke6! and White mops up two pawns for the N, following which he has three connected passed pawns: 1-0.

12

 

 

FEN

8/3k1K2/1pNp4/1PpPp3/2P1P2b/5P2/8/8 w – – 0 1

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play: analyse 1…Rc8, as played in the game

7

Solution

1..Rc8?? was a mistake: 2 Ra7! wins at least the Rd7, if not more. Alas, White missed the opportunity, and eventually lost the game.

8

FEN

1r4k1/1q1r1p1p/4pbp1/2R5/1P6/2P1BP2/R3Q1KP/8 b – – 0 32

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

5.jpg

Bloussenko v Pugachov, corres 1966-68

 

Solution

1Qb4!! exploits the fact that the Qf8 and Rd8 are tied to each other; that the Bg4 is LPDO; and the threat of Qc3+. The result: 1-0.

If 1…Qb4, then 2 Rd8+ Kg7 3 Rg8+ Kh6[] 4 Rf6 mate.

4

 

FEN

3r1q1k/pQ3B1p/8/3R2p1/6b1/6P1/PP2r2P/5RK1 w – – 0 0

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play

1

Ventura v Neu, corres 1968-69

Solution

1… Nc3!! and the threat of 2 …Nd5 mate wins the exchange.

3

FEN

8/2k5/4p1Np/1pr1Pp1P/1R2nKp1/PpP3P1/1P6/8 w – – 0 0

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

Beardsworth Franic 1

Jukcenko v Michalek,  Czechoslovakia 1969

 

Solution

1 Rd8! and 1-0; Black collapses.

2

FEN

4r1k1/pbq2rp1/4QnN1/1pb3Np/5B1P/2P5/PP3P2/2KR3R w – – 0 1

Daily Chess Puzzle: 50 years ago today

Today’s problem is another game between Bent Larsen and Heinz Lehmann, two players who featured in a recent puzzle taken from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter. One of the pleasures of writing this blog, and using Megabase to find the games, is to learn more about different players, or see new games.

Today, having not long ago upgraded to Chessbase 15 (first impressions: some nice changes), and with its superb Instant Analysis graph, it is easy to see if games might be “interesting” or what their key moments are.

Today’s puzzle is having seen the red dip at move 33.

instant

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Quite nicely, this game took place 50 years ago today

White to play: played 1 Kf3: what should Black have done?

Larsen Bent - Lehmann Heinz (33...Kg7)

 

Larsen v Lehmann, Palma de Mallorca 7 December 1968

Solution

1 Kf3? was a mistake; Black played 1…Kf6, and the game was eventually drawn, but 1…Ra6! rounds up the Pf2.

2 Kf4?? loses to 2…Rf2+ and 3….Rf5 mate, so all White can do is retreat, 2 Kg2 Rf6 3 Ra4

Larsen Bent - Lehmann Heinz (36.Rxa4)

3…Rff2+ 4  Kg1 Rg2+ 5 Kh1 Rh2+ 6 Kg1[] Rbg2+ 7 Kf1

Larsen Bent - Lehmann Heinz (40.Kf1)

and Black is winning.

 

FEN

8/2R2pk1/6p1/r2p3p/p2P3P/R3P1P1/1r3PK1/8 w – – 0 34