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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the current European Club Championship in Halkidiki.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play: examine 1…Qd4, as played in the game

3

Bates v Vitiugov, Halkidiki, October 2018

Solution

Black should have played 1…Rd4, as shown yesterday. Black’s 1…Qd4 won in the game, after White played 2 Nf4, but 2 Qg4!! leads to near equality.

4

2… hg 3 ed fg 4 Ra6 or 4 d5, and the game is balanced.

5.JPG

 

FEN

4r3/3q1pkn/p1R3N1/7p/1P1Pr1nQ/P3P1P1/5PP1/2R3K1 b – – 0 31

 

 

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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the current European Club Championship in Halkidiki.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play

1

Bates v Vitiugov, Halkidiki, October 2018

Solution

Black should have played 1…Rd4!! since if 2 ed, 2…Qc6! wins

2

Instead, Black played 1…Qd4, examined tomorrow.

FEN

4r3/3q1pkn/p1R3N1/7p/1P1Pr1nQ/P3P1P1/5PP1/2R3K1 b – – 0 31

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the current European Club Championship in Halkidiki

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play

1

Bates v Vitiugov, Halkidiki, October 2018

Solution

Black could have played (but didn’t- the game went on, erupting in different ways) 1…Re3! -+

If 2 fe (else White is down a pawn) 2…Qe3+ 3 Kh1[] g5! 4 Qh2[] Qd3

2

and Black dominates.

FEN

4rn2/1p2qpk1/p1p1rnp1/3p3p/3P3Q/3BP1P1/PP2NPP1/2R2RK1 b – – 0 21
wKg1,Qh4,Ne2,Bd3,Rc1,f1,Pa2,b2,d4,e3,f2,g2,g3/bKg7,Qe7,Nf6,f8,Re6,e8,Pa6,b7,c6,d5,f7,g6,h5

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the currently ongoing Batumi Olympiad. I am writing this message live as I watch the games, though it will be posted on my site in several days’ time, since I write my blogs some days in advance.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

3

Neomniachtchi v Bacrot, Round 11 (final), Batumi 5/10/18

 

Solution

An easy one today: Ian played 1 g6, and Etienne resigned, a 24 move last round victory.

If allowed, 2 Rh8+ and 3 Qh1+ 4 Qh7 mate follows, otherwise e.g 1…Rf5 2 Rf5 ef 3 Qf7+ Kh8[] 4 Kg2 and Rh1 mating.

There is still plenty of time to go in the last round (this is live blogged, but posted in areas), but China-USA looks like heading for four draws, so maybe we will have a tie-break with several teams with the same match point.

Nepo clearly ate red meat for breakfast:

4

A Larsen type opening, Nf3, e3, c4 followed by b3 and Be2, then lunged out with 8 h4 and 10 g4, and was rewarded with this fairly “simple” victory: route one chess at its best.

FEN

r2q1rk1/pQ4p1/1p2p3/2p3PR/8/1P2P3/Pn1PNP2/R4K2 w – – 0 24
wKf1,Qb7,Ne2,Ra1,h5,Pa2,b3,d2,e3,f2,g5/bKg8,Qd8,Nb2,Ra8,f8,Pa7,b6,c5,e6,g7

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the currently ongoing Batumi Olympiad. I am writing this message live as I watch the games, though it will be posted on my site in several days’ time, since I write my blogs some days in advance.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play: played 1…Rc8 2 Rc8 Bc8: examine

1

Adams v Jumabayev,  Round 11 (final), Batumi 5/10/18

 

Solution

This blog is being written live, as the games are in play. Its a Friday, and I am working, so only peeking at the games when I can. [the blog will be posted some days later]

An hour ago, Mickey’s game was level, but now he seems to be on the path to victory.  2…Bc8? was a mistake, allowing the little tic-tac 3 Nde4! picking up an important pawn. 3…Ne4 4 Qd8 Rd8 5 Ne4.

2

FEN

r2qrbk1/1b3pp1/n4n1p/8/Pp2p3/1B2B1NP/1P1N1PP1/2RQR1K1 b – – 0 24
wKg1,Qd1,Nd2,g3,Bb3,e3,Rc1,e1,Pa4,b2,f2,g2,h3/bKg8,Qd8,Na6,f6,Bb7,f8,Ra8,e8,Pb4,e4,f7,g7,h6

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the currently ongoing Batumi Olympiad. I am writing this message live as I watch the games, though it will be posted on my site in several days’ time, since I write my blogs some days in advance.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play: Black has just played Ne5-c4

31

Ivanchuk v Djukic, Ukraine v Montenegro,  Round 9, Batumi 3/10/18

 

Solution

I am blogging this live; and not far into the session, had just logged in. As is my habit, I follow England, plus some of the very top matches, plus some favourite players like Chucky.

I was surprised to see 1-0, 26: most of the other games in the round were not much out of the opening. But the game was lots of Yugoslav Dragon, and then 1…Nc4??

2 Rc4 Rc4[] 3 Bg7 resigns!

32

Maybe a bit premature, but rook moves, Bh6, Bc2, likely followed by Bf5-e6, and it is either mate or the a and b pawns push.

FEN

1rr3k1/p3p1bp/3p4/3P1pp1/1Rn5/1BB2P2/PP1R2PP/1K6 w – – 0 25
wKb1,Bb3,c3,Rb4,d2,Pa2,b2,d5,f3,g2,h2/bKg8,Nc4,Bg7,Rb8,c8,Pa7,d6,e7,f5,g5,h7

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the currently ongoing Batumi Olympiad. I am writing this message live as I watch the games, though it will be posted on my site in several days’ time, since I write my blogs some days in advance.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play: White win or draw?

7

Radjabov v So, Ajerbaijan v USA , Round 8, Batumi 2/10/18

Black to play: White win or draw?

8

(position set up; not from the game).

Solution

Years ago, I watched a wonderful series of videos by Alex Yermolinsky on ICC which taught me a lot about these endings. The second is drawn- White hasn’t got a lever in which to force some discomfort on the king file, so Black will play g6, h7-h6, and shuffle his king between h7 and g7 to the end.

But the game continuation is won. White will nudge the a pawn forward to a7 if allowed, and then play his king up the board to the comfort of b8, where the Rb7 will cover him from a check on the b file.

Black’s best is to try to hope for a fortress in a QvR ending if allowed, though maybe White can always prevent this by moving his king to say b2 and then advancing it on the a and b files.

9

As I write this blog, the game is ongoing, but I assume Teimour will win.

 

FEN

6k1/5pp1/P1R4p/8/8/6KP/5PP1/1r6 b – – 0 41
wKg3,Rc6,Pa6,f2,g2,h3/bKg8,Rb1,Pf7,g7,h6