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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

10

Estrin v Katalymov, Barhaul 1969

Solution

1 Re6+! and if 1…fe?? 2 Qh5 mate; so 1…de 2 Qf6!

11

And the double attack on the LPDO Rh8 and on d8 wins the rook.

FEN

2r1kb1r/3p1p1p/p1N1pp2/8/1p6/1P3Q2/q1P2PPP/3RR1K1 w k – 0 19

 

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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

8

von Holzhausen v Tarrasch, Frankfurt 1912

Solution

1 Bf7+! Kf7 2 Ne6! 1-0 after a few more moves.

9

FEN

r1bqr1k1/pppnbppp/2np4/8/2BNP3/2N4P/PPP2PP1/R1BQR1K1 w – – 0 10

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

6

Fischer v Reshevsky, New York 1959

Solution

A classic.

1 Bf7+ Kf7 2 Ne6!

7

Surprisingly, Reshevsky played on for another 30 moves.

FEN

r1bqnrk1/pp1pppbp/6p1/n3P3/3N4/1BN1B3/PPP2PPP/R2QK2R w KQ – 0 10

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

4

Contoski v Heisler, Minneapolis 1965

 

Solution

1 Bf7+! Kf7 (1…Rf7 2 Ne6 Qe8[] 3 Nd5 +-) 2 Ne6!! 1-0

5

2…Ke6 3 Qd5+ Kf6 4 Bg5 mate; 2…Qe8 3 Nc7 Qd8[] 4 Qd5+ 1-0

 

FEN

r1bq1rk1/1p1nppbp/p2p2p1/n7/3NP2P/1BN1BP2/PPPQ2P1/R3K2R w KQ – 0 1

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

3

Gumprich v Hodakowsky, Bad Neuenahr, 1958

 

Solution

White played 1 g4? amd eventually won, but 1 Nf4! is stronger (as is 1 Nf6). If 1…c6 2 Ne6! and Black’s position caves in. So 1…fg 2 b4 or even 2 Ne6 and the e pawn decides.

FEN

b2n3k/2p5/3p2BP/1p1P3N/3P4/5p2/1P4PP/6K1 w – – 0 41

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

1

Kolarov v Franz, Erfurt 1955

 

Solution

1 Rg4+ Kh5 (1…Kh6 2 Rg6+ and 3 Rf6 +-) 2 Rf6! and after 2….Rf6, 3 Rh4+ picks up the LPDO Rh6. 1-0.

2

FEN

1r5r/5R2/1p1p1b2/1P2p1k1/2PpB2R/5PP1/1P3K2/8 b – – 0 35

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

3

Polugaevsky v Antoshin, Leningrad 1956

Solution

A nice one today: one has to look fairly deep, but the depth is fathomable.

1 g6! Qg6 2 Rg3! Qd3[] (to protect the LPDO Rd8) 3 Bg5 (double attack on the Rd8 and Qd3) 1-0.

4

According to my Megabase, this was the only decisive game in the games between these two players.

 

FEN

3rnbk1/5ppp/p3p3/1p2P1P1/7Q/P3B2R/1Pq2P1P/4R1K1 w – – 0 30