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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is an “old” chestnut, which I recently saw on Twitter, and enjoyed solving afresh.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play

Pos162

Krasenkow v Nakamura, Barcelona 19/10/2007

Solution

1…Qf2+!! is the spectacular first move. If White doesn’t take, then 2…Qf6; so 2 Kf2 Bc5+ 3 Kf3 (3 Kf1 c3+ and 4…c2) 3…Rf6+ 5 Kg4[]

Pos163

This is as far as I could see clearly: though I had the stepping stone comfort of seeing there was a draw by repetition by the Rf6, so I had nothing to lose; and felt that 5…Ne5+ might win, with the idea of gaining a tempo for Bc8+.

In fact 5…Ne5+ does win: see e.g. the analysis by Ftacnik in Megabase.

FEN

4r1k1/3nbppp/bqr2B2/p7/2p5/6P1/P2N1PBP/1R1QR1K1 b – – 0 21

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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

Pos160

 

Wade v Boxall, Middleton 1953

 

Solution

Ignore the threat, just as Purdy tells us to: 1 Bf7! and if 1…Rf7 2 Ng6 mate.

Pos161

FEN

5r1k/3rbppp/p2p1n2/1p2q3/3QPN2/1B5R/PPP3PP/5R1K w – – 0 1

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play: examine 1….f6 2 Re2 fg 3 Qb4 Qd4, as played in the game

Pos158

Keres v Beni, Luhcovice 1969

Solution

At the end of the sequence, 4 c5+ wins the LPDO Q.

Pos159

FEN

2rq1rk1/pb2pp1p/1p4p1/4R1B1/1nPP4/1B6/P2Q1PPP/R5K1 b – – 0 18

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play: examine 1…Ng4, as played in the game

Pos156

Andersson v Doda, Lodz 1969

 

Solution

Ulf replied to 1…Ng4? with the fabulous 2 ef! ignoring the threat and after 2…Nh2 3 Nh7+! won the game. 2…Rh2 is similar, and 2…Bf5 is met by 3 Bg4 winning the N.

2…Nf6 would be met by 3 Ne4 with a double attack on the Q and the LPDO Rh8 (by 4Qg7+)

Pos157

FEN

5k1r/p2bpp2/3p1n2/2q2pN1/1p1pP3/3P1B2/1PP3QP/6RK b – – 0 28

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play: examine 1…h5, as played in the game

Pos154

Solution

1…Nd3! and the threat of 2 Nf2 mate means that Black loses his bishop: 1-0.

Pos155

FEN

8/7p/p5p1/1pN5/1P6/P5Pk/6bP/6K1 b – – 0 42

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play

Pos152

Oliff v Keogn, Dublin 1964

Solution

In the game, the players drew after 1…Qg3+ and 2…Qh3+ and perpetual check.

But 1…Qg3+ 2 Kh1 e3! breaks through.

Pos153

Just as after 1..Qg3+ 2fg; if after 2..e3 White captures the Queen it is check, check and mate: Rf1+; R8f2+; Rh1 mate.

This puzzle, which I thought was nice, took me a fair while: until rather than searching for specific moves, I thought of the maxim “bringing all the pieces to the party“. Just like with Lajos’s win over Viktor yesterday, 1…e3 breaks the defences.

FEN

5r1k/2Q3pp/6p1/8/2P1prP1/7q/1P3P2/R2B1RK1 b – – 0 1

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Today it is the finale of yesterday’s puzzle.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play

Pos149

Korchnoi v Portisch, Berverwijk 1968

Solution

1…e3! bringing another piece to the party.

If say 2 Rg4 then 2…e2+! is a nice finish: 3 Re2[[ Qh1 mate.

Pos150

In the game, Viktor played 2 Be3 and resigned after 2…Qh1+: after 3 Ke2[] Re3+!  4 fe[] Qg2 mate.

Pos151

FEN

4r1k1/2pr1pbp/Q7/8/4pRn1/1P4P1/P1P2PPq/2B1RK2 b – – 0 31