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Daily chess puzzle

Today’s problem is from the August 1979 Chess magazine. I have hundreds (many hundreds) of magazines on my book shelves, and I thought I would dip into them; and thought I would start with going forty years back.

As has been my custom on this blog for a while, I adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play: what was better than 1…b3, as played in the game (and as posted yesterday)

Gruenfeld Yehuda - Lind Jan Olov (22.Rc1)

Grunefeld v Lind, Lloyds Bank Open London 1978

Solution

1..Qb8!, reversing the move order, is better: there is no need to first give up the Pb4. White has nothing better than 2 gf when Black again wins the exchange, but with an extra pawn.

Gruenfeld Yehuda - Lind Jan Olov (23...Qb8)

 

FEN

3qr1kb/p3pp1p/3p2pB/3P1b2/1pr3PR/5P2/PPPQN3/1KR5 b – – 0 22

Daily chess puzzle

Today’s problem is from the August 1979 Chess magazine. I have hundreds (many hundreds) of magazines on my book shelves, and I thought I would dip into them; and thought I would start with going forty years back.

As has been my custom on this blog for a while, I adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play

Gruenfeld Yehuda - Lind Jan Olov (22.Rc1)

 

Grunefeld v Lind, Lloyds Bank Open London 1978

Solution

1…b3 2 ab[] Qb8!!

Gruenfeld Yehuda - Lind Jan Olov (23...Qb8)

White’s best is 3 gf giving up the exchange: 3…Rh4.

The above is not all: I will add a further puzzle tomorrow on this position.

FEN

3q1rk1/pp1bppbp/3p1np1/8/2rNP2P/2N1BP2/PPPQ2P1/2KR3R w – – 0 14

Daily chess puzzle

Today’s problem is from the August 1979 Chess magazine. I have hundreds (many hundreds) of magazines on my book shelves, and I thought I would dip into them; and thought I would start with going forty years back.

As has been my custom on this blog for a while, I adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play

Borm Frans - Haik Aldo (26.a3)

Born v Haik, Lloyds Bank Open London 1978

Solution

1..Ba3+!, and White resigned, since if the Bishop is captured, 2…Nd4 forks the Q and B, and White’s position collapses.

Borm Frans - Haik Aldo (26...Bxa3+)

 

FEN

1k6/1p1r1pp1/1nn1p1p1/1Nb1P1B1/2P3P1/PP5P/2Q1B1q1/2K2R2 b – – 0 26

Daily chess puzzle

Today’s problem is from the August 1979 Chess magazine. I have hundreds (many hundreds) of magazines on my book shelves, and I thought I would dip into them; and thought I would start with going forty years back.

As has been my custom on this blog for a while, I adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

Wicker Kevin J - Franklin Michael J (25...Bxh4)

Wicker v Frankin, Lloyds Bank Open London 1978

Solution

1 Qg6 (or 1 Qe3) both win: 1…Qd5+ 2 Ne4.

White’s 1 e7 is still good, but maybe less strong. 1…Qd5+ 2 Nf3 Bg3 3 ef(Q)+ Kf8 4 Kg3

Wicker Kevin J - Franklin Michael J (29.Kxg3)

Less strong, thought White is winning easily enough.

FEN

3q1rkr/p5p1/4P1pp/1p1P4/2pP3b/2P3QB/PP1N2K1/R6R w – – 0 26

Daily chess puzzle

Today’s puzzle is from the penultimate round of the British Chess Championships. The blog was prepared live during the round, and as is my custom, is posted in arrears.

White to play

Stephen Gordon v Justin Tan. British Championships, Torquay, 3rd August 2019

Solution

1 Nc6! a move which involves a lot of calculation.

Justin played 1…Kf8, but if instead he had played 1…Rc6, which seemingly wins a piece, then 2 bc Qd4 3 Qb8+ Qd8 4 c7! and the pawn promotes.

Importantly, Black doesn’t have a perpetual check, either.

Daily chess puzzle

Today’s problem is from the August 1979 Chess magazine. I have hundreds (many hundreds) of magazines on my book shelves, and I thought I would dip into them; and thought I would start with going forty years back.

As has been my custom on this blog for a while, I adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

Tatai Stefano - Kopec Danny (25...Nd6)

Tatai v Kopec,  Lloyds Bank Open London 1978

Solution

1 Bg4! if nothing else improves the bishop. 1..Qg4 2 Qd6 Qe4? 4 Rb8! and wins.

Tatai Stefano - Kopec Danny (28.Rb8)

There isn’t a perpetual: 4…Qe1+ 5 Kg2[] Qe4+[] 6 Kf1Qh1+[] 7 Ke2[] Qe4+[] 8 Kd2 and the checks stop.

 

Black could have defended better: 2…Qd6 3 Qc5! d6!, and White is better, but would you win against Magnus Carlsen? Likely, not.

FEN

2r3k1/1R1p1ppp/3nq3/2p1p3/2P1P3/P4BP1/3Q1P1P/6K1 w – – 0 26

Daily chess puzzle

Another recent finish of a 3 minute blitz game on Chess.com

White to play and win

Allan Beardsworth v Sergey Melkozerov, 3-0 blitz, Chess.com, 19th July 2019

Solution

1 Nf6! Bf6[] 2 Be4 and mate can’t be prevented. The first move prevents Black interposing f6-f5.