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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from an old British Chess Magazine.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Gelfand Boris - Movsesian Sergei (89...g3)

Boris Gelfand v S Movsesian, Batumi 3/12/19

Solution

1 Bd5! and it is a draw; 1…Kg4 2 Bc6 Kh4 3 Bd7 and the Pg3 falls.

Gelfand Boris - Movsesian Sergei (92.Bd7)

I got null points on this: but Boris found it, of course!

 

FEN

8/5Bn1/8/7p/5k1P/6p1/6K1/8 w – – 0 90

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the recent Superbet tournament.

1

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play and draw

Caruana Fabuana - Karjakin Sergei (24.Ne2).jpg

Caruana v Karjakin, Superbet Bucharest, 7/11/19

Solution

The crucial position: Sergei blundered, played 1…Kh7? and after 2 Kf6, Kh6 was forced to prevent Kg5, and then 3 Nd4! wins.

Caruana Fabuana - Karjakin Sergei (26.Nd4)

Instead, 1…Bc7 2 Kf6 Ba7! draws: when the White king is on f6, the Black king must be on h6 and the bishop on the a7-g1 diagonal, blocking Nd4-f5.

Arrows

The theme has elements of “corresponding squares” to it.

 

FEN

1b6/5K2/7k/7p/7P/6P1/4N3/8 b – – 0 24

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the recent Superbet tournament in Bucharest.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play: think of a plan to try to win (though the ending is drawn)

Caruana Fabuana - Karjakin Sergei (1...Bc3).jpg

 

Caruana v Karjakin, Superbet Bucharest, 7/11/19

1

Solution

I came across this ending whilst on Twitter, listening to the commentary of the final few moves. The commentators consistently said “draw” “why is he playing on” “why doesn’t he conserve his energy” until a moment after the win became self-evident. (I don’t know to save a link to a video on Twitter)

Wonderful persistence by Fabiano.

His ‘trick’ – or, rather, skill, was to find the position whereby a Nf5+ (from where it defends the Pg3) permits a Kg5:

Caruana Fabuana - Karjakin Sergei (26.Nd4).jpg

The ending is well worth playing through and understanding.

FEN

8/8/6k1/7p/2N1K2P/2b3P1/8/8 w – – 0 2

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from an old edition of the British Chess Magazine

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play

Milov Leonid - Gelfand Boris (63...Kxb4)

 

Milov v Gelfand, Kirovabad 1 1984

Solution

1…Kc4 (1…Kb3 also wins, but Kc4 is simpler) 2 Ke4 g2 3 Bh2 b4 4 Kf3 b3 and one of the pawns queens.

Milov Leonid - Gelfand Boris (69...b3)

FEN

8/8/8/1p2B1p1/1k2n3/5KpP/8/8 w – – 0 64

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from an old edition of the British Chess Magazine

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play

Ljubojevic Ljubomir - Gelfand Boris (14.Rd1).jpg

 

Ljubojevic v Gelfand, Amber blindfold 28/3/1999

Solution

1…Nf2+! and after 2 Kf2[] Ng4+ and 3…Ne3 -+

Ljubojevic Ljubomir - Gelfand Boris (16...Nxe3)

FEN

rbbqr1k1/pp3ppp/8/1N1pn3/1B2n3/P3PN2/1PQ1BPPP/3RK2R b K – 0 14

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from an old edition of the British Chess Magazine

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play, after Black plays 1…Rd6 here.

Gelfand Boris - Ivanchuk Vassily (29.Qxe5)

 

Gelfand v Ivanchuk, Sochi 11/8/2008

Solution

1…Bd6

2 Qh5! a lovely move, hitting f7.

Gelfand Boris - Ivanchuk Vassily (30.Qh5)

2…Bd7 (2…Be6 3 Qg6+ Kh8 4 Qh7 mate).

3 e5! Be8[] 3 Qf3!

Gelfand Boris - Ivanchuk Vassily (32.Qf3)

3…Rdd8 keeping the defence of the Pd5.

4 Qf5!  (4 e6 also wins) Bg7[] 5 Qg4! Bf7[] 6 e6!  1-0.

Gelfand Boris - Ivanchuk Vassily (35.e6)

I presume, in awe, that Boris saw all the combination through to the end.

FEN

r1b2bk1/2R5/pp3r1p/3pQ3/1P2P3/6P1/7P/6K1 b – – 0 29

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from an old edition of the British Chess Magazine

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Gelfand Boris - Ivanchuk Vassily (27...dxe5)

 

Gelfand v Ivanchuk, Sochi 11/8/2008

Solution

1 Nh6+!

Gelfand Boris - Ivanchuk Vassily (28.Nxh6+!)

1…gh 2 Qe5: a “slow” move, with a double attack.

Gelfand Boris - Ivanchuk Vassily (29.Qxe5)

and wins: to be looked after further tomorrow.

FEN

r1b2bk1/2R3p1/pp3r1p/3ppN1Q/1P2P3/6P1/7P/6K1 w – – 0 28