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Daily chess puzzle: Check Mate #409

Another puzzle from Dragoslav Andric’s 1981 book “Matni Udar”.

 

White to play and mate Black

4091

Heffer v Felmy, Hamburg 1975

 

Solution

An unusual variant of the normal breakthrough by d4-d5 (which aims to open the e-file, to prevent Black’s king’s escape.

1 Nh5! Nh5[] 2 Nd5! 1-0

4092

Qh7+ and Qh8 mate follows, or Black loses the Queen.

FEN

r2r2k1/ppqb1pp1/2n1pn1p/8/3P4/P1NQ2N1/1P3PPP/1B1RR1K1 w – – 0 1

Daily chess puzzle: Check Mate #408

Another puzzle from Dragoslav Andric’s 1981 book “Matni Udar”.

 

Black to play and mate White

4081

Solution

A position I knew: only recently I have been proof-reading Quality Chess’s forthcoming latest book on Tal, and the position is either in it, or I found it in Megabase when checking something.

1…Qg5! and the LPDO rook drops off because the Q is tied to defending it and e1, and can’t defend both.

4082

FEN

5rk1/p3Rp1p/6p1/Q7/4Pqb1/8/P1R2PPP/3rN1K1 b – – 0 25

Daily chess puzzle: Check Mate #407

Another puzzle from Dragoslav Andric’s 1981 book “Matni Udar”.

 

White to play and mate Black

4071

Novozenjin v Panfilov, Vladimir 1975

Solution

A nice variation on a standard theme: 1 Qh6+! gh[] 2 Rf6+

4072

2…Kh5 3 Rh6 mate; or 2…Kg7 3 Bh6+ and 4 Rf8 mate.

Very elegant how they both end in a tidy mate.

FEN

5R2/6pp/p4pk1/4Pb2/8/4QPKP/3B4/r2q4 w – – 0 1

Daily chess puzzle: Check Mate #406

Another puzzle from Dragoslav Andric’s 1981 book “Matni Udar”.

 

White to play and mate Black

4061

Sotov v Glebov, Moscow 1975

 

Solution

I found 1 Nb5+ Kb8[] 2 Nb5 which mates in a few moves, but the game’s 1 Qc7! is even nicer. The threat of smothered mate decides.

4062.JPG

(threat 3 Qb8+ and 4 Nc7 mate)

FEN

k6r/rb3R1p/NQ4p1/2p2n2/1p6/8/PPn3PP/6K1 w – – 0 1

Daily chess puzzle: Check Mate #405

Another puzzle from Dragoslav Andric’s 1981 book “Matni Udar”.

 

White to play and mate Black

4051

Rotmanov v Laska, SSSR 1975

Solution

A pretty one, and a motif which I don’t think I have seen before.

How to get at Black’s king?

1 Rd4! threatens 2 Qd3+ 1-0, so 1…Qa6[]

4052

2 Rd2+!! ed[] 3 Qf3+ and 4 Qf2 mate.

4053

PS

As happened a few days ago, I again solved the wrong puzzle: what has happened is that I took a photocopy of the page from the book, to take on my dog walks, and the print quality was poor/paper got crumpled, so I solved the same position but with a rook on h4 instead. Same solution: or a dual: either Rd4 followed by Rd2+ wins.

 

FEN

8/8/4q3/5p2/1R5P/1pQ1p3/4k1P1/3b2K1 w – – 0 1

Daily chess puzzle: Check Mate #404(2)

Another puzzle from Dragoslav Andric’s 1981 book “Matni Udar”.

 

In yesterday’s puzzle, what did both players miss?

4041

Sveshnikov v Sushchikh, USSR 1975

Solution

The moves given yesterday were

1 Qc4 Nc4

2 Rff7+ Ke8

4042

3 Re7+ Kd8

4 Rd7+ Ke8

4045

5 Nc4 Be5

6 Ne5 de 7 Rb7 Qd6 8 a6 etc 1-0

A really astute reader (such as my friend Komodo, in my case) will note that 5 Nc4?? threw all the advantage away: the engine switches from +3 to 0.0 instantly. 5…Qc8!

4046

The point is that Black’s queen gets to either a6 or e6 next move, after which either mate on e2 or entry on e4 is threatened. White has to suffice with perpetual check.

Instead, 5 Nd5!! is Komodo’s only winning move.

4048

As soon as you see it (as soon as the engine pings) you see why: Nf6+ and Rf7 mate follows): but so unnatural not to take the N.

Chess is a hard game.

FEN

1q5r/4kpR1/1N1p4/P3nR1p/2b1P3/1QP2p2/1P3P1b/4K3 w РР0 35   (original diagram)

2q1k2r/3R2R1/3p4/P6p/2N1P3/2P2p2/1P3P1b/4K3 w – – 0 40 (after 5…Qc8)

 

Daily chess puzzle: Check Mate #404

Another puzzle from Dragoslav Andric’s 1981 book “Matni Udar”.

This one has a  twist. And a PS.

White to play and mate Black

4041

Sveshnikov v Sushchikh, USSR 1975

Solution

Since 1 Re5?? is a blunder (1…Be5 and then 2…Bg7 is unfortunate) and whilst 1 Nd5 is good and safe (and Komodo tells me it gives White some advantage), since this is a puzzle book position, the first move has to be 1 Qc4!

1…Nc4[] (1…Qb6?? 2 Re5+! and 3 ab) 2 Rff7+ Ke8 (2…Ke6 3 Re7+ and 4 Nd5 mate)

4042

Now, White checks and checks, in order to keep Black’s Queen at bay: 3 Nc4? Qc8 throws away all the advantage, and White has to bale out with perpetual.

So 3 Re7+ Kd8[] 4 Rd7+ Ke8 5 Nc4 Be5 6 Ne5 de 7 Rb7

4043

and the a pawn advances: if e.g. 7…Qa8 8 a6 Qa6?? then 9 Rb8 mate.

In the game Black resigned after 7..Qd6 8 a6 Kf8 9 Rgc7.

4044

The twist

What did both players miss? There is something wrong in my analysis, and one of the playeer’s play could have been improved. Answer tomorrow.

PS

In this game, Sveshnikov’s opponent played the Sveshnikov Sicilian against him. The game was from the USSR army championship, so not a training game.

FEN

1q5r/4kpR1/1N1p4/P3nR1p/2b1P3/1QP2p2/1P3P1b/4K3 w – – 0 35