Skip to content

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem was seen on Twitter in November; the game isn’t in Megabase but I found it on chessgames.com where some postings doubt its authenticity; but the combination is very nice.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play

 

J M de Oliveira Gomes - Joaquim Gentil Caetano Netto (14.Kg2).gif

Gomes v Netto, Rio de Janeiro 7/1/1942

Solution

1…Rg8!;

and in the game 2 c3 Nh4+! 3 gh g5

j m de oliveira gomes - joaquim gentil caetano netto (16...g5)

and Black wins the queen, with an attack continuing.

 

FEN

r3k1r1/1pp2ppp/pb1p1qn1/4p2b/2B1P3/N1PP1NPP/PP2QPK1/R4R2 b q – 0 15

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the current Wijk aan Zee tournament

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black played 1…Ba4; should he have?

vidit santosh gujrathi - van foreest jorden (36.ke3)

Vidit v Van Foreest, J   Wijk aan Zee 15/1/2019

Solution

1…Ba4 is… the losing move.  Black had played a long line- I read on twitter that he took 3 minutes for his first 30 moves, which resulted in the pawn down opposite B ending, which no doubt Black assumed was drawn.

Danny King has produced another of his excellent PowerPlay videos on this ending, showing why 1…Bd1! draws, forcing the King to look after the Pe2; and why 1..Ba4? loses.

Danny also shows how the resultant endgame is identical to game 11 of the Carlsen -Caruana World Championship match, in which Fabiano showed he had the knowledge of how to draw the endgame.

A fascinating video; if the link doesn’t work, then search for Danny on YouTube, looking Vidit or Foreest.

FEN

3k4/5pp1/2PBp3/7p/7P/4KPP1/2b1P3/8 b – – 0 36

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from a recent newspaper article- from the Spectator.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play

botvinnik mikhail moisevich - smyslov vassily v (26.qg5)

Botvinnik v Smyslov, game 18, World Championship match 19/54/1958

Solution

Smyslov played 1…Rde8, and eventually lost the game, but 1…Rd2! would have won.

After say 2 Be6+ Rf7, White only has 3 Bf7+ Kf7 and no more checks.

botvinnik mikhail moisevich - smyslov vassily v (28...kxf7)

A picture tells a 1,000 words, and below is the Chessbase15 quick annotation diagram of the game.

capture

Black missed his main chance, and blundered in the R+B endgame at move 46.

FEN

3r1rk1/pp5p/2b3p1/2p1p1Q1/5P2/2P1R1PB/P1q4P/4R1K1 b – – 0 26

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the recent World Rapid Championships in St. Petersburg.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

duda jan-krzysztof - svidler peter (35...f6)

Duda v Svidler, St. Petersburg Rapid 28/12/18

 

Solution

1 Rf5! and the Black Queen is trapped, and will be won after f2-f3.

duda jan-krzysztof - svidler peter (36.rf5)

FEN

6k1/6p1/r1rp1p1p/3R3P/p1p1P1q1/P5P1/1PQR1PK1/8 w – – 0 36

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the recent World Blitz and Rapidplay championships in St. Petersburg.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

Anand Viswanathan - Christiansen Johan-Sebastian (35...Nxc4).gif

Anand v Christiansen, St. Petersburg, blitz 29/1/218

 

Solution

1 Rc4! to distract the Black Queen from defending e7; 1…Qc4[] 2 Qe7! and since the Re8 is tied to the back rank,  White has won a piece.

anand viswanathan - christiansen johan-sebastian (37.qxe7)

FEN

4r1k1/p3r1pp/4P3/2q2pQ1/2n2N2/8/6PP/1RR4K w – – 0 36

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is a nice one seen recently on Chessbase.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

Edouard Romain - Zumsande Martin (32...Bf4).gif

Edouard v Zumsande, Bundesliga 25/10/2018

 

Solution

1 Rf4! (obvious, but the follow up isn’t) 1…Rf4 [] 2 h3! (the point) and White wins a piece.

edouard romain - zumsande martin (34.h3)

Black gets the Pd4 after 2…Qg7 but White is winning, partly due to the exposed Black king.

 

FEN

5rk1/7p/p7/3p4/Pp1Ppbq1/1P2B3/6PP/4QRK1 w – – 0 33

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the recent British Knockout in London

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

1

Jones G v McShane L, London 16/12/18

 

Solution

Watching live, I missed Gawain’s shot, and didn’t even consider it.

I should have: examine all biffs, although even if I had, it might have been too deep for me to see.

1 Bf7+!

Luke played 1…Qf7, and resigned a few moves later. The defence I struggled with, until eventually seeing it, was the alternate capture, 1…Kf7:

2

Gawain’s idea was 2 Rd6! Qd6[] 3 Ng5+ K moves 4 Ne4.

3

Forking the Q and R, and note that Black’s queen can’t move to d2 hitting the LPDO Re1, so White nets a good extra pawn, and Black’s king is exposed.

FEN

2b1r1k1/4qp1p/3b2p1/p1rBp3/2P5/Q4N1P/1P3PP1/3RR1K1 w – – 0 25
wKg1,Qa3,Nf3,Bd5,Rd1,e1,Pb2,c4,f2,g2,h3/bKg8,Qe7,Bc8,d6,Rc5,e8,Pa5,e5,f7,g6,h7