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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the March 1979 Chess magaizine. I have hundreds (many hundreds) of magazines on my book shelves, and I thought I would dip into them; and thought I would start with this magazine from forty years back.

Magazine cover

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play

Pos73

Rodriguez v Andersson, Calella 1978

Solution

1…Ng4! 2 hg Rd4!

Pos74

3 Nf6+ Bf6 4 Rf6 Rd1+ 5 Kf2[] Qe3+ 6 Ke3[] Kg7, and after the rook moves, Black wins another pawn- either the c pawn, a pawn, or g pawn!

Pos75

FEN

3r2k1/pp4b1/1qp3bp/4n1p1/3NN1P1/1PP1Q2P/P5B1/5RK1 b – – 0 1

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the March 1979 Chess magaizine. I have hundreds (many hundreds) of magazines on my book shelves, and I thought I would dip into them; and thought I would start with this magazine from forty years back.

Magazine cover

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Pos70

Skorpik v Vinklar, Czechoslovakia 1978

 

Solution

No prizes for the first two moves, but it is the follow which matters.

1 Bh7+ Kh7[] 2 Qh5+ Kg8[]

Pos71

3 Re3! or 3 Re4! – the rook lift and decides. 3 Nf7 Rf7 4 g6 Bh4! is only +=.

Pos72

 

FEN

2rq1rk1/pp1bbppp/4p3/4N1P1/1nPP4/3B4/P4P1P/R1BQR1K1 w – – 0 1

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the March 1979 Chess magaizine. I have hundreds (many hundreds) of magazines on my book shelves, and I thought I would dip into them; and thought I would start with this magazine from forty years back.

Magazine cover

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Sindik Ervin - Cebalo Miso (33...Qb5)

Sindik v Cebalo, Zagreb 1978

Solution

White played 1 R7c3? losing most of his advantage, and it all whittled away until later Black blundered, resulting in yesterday’s position.

Instead the creeping move 1 Qf6 would have broken the back of Black’s defences: hitting the LPDO Bd6. If for instance 1…Bd6 2 Rc7 Qb4 another creeping move 3 Qf5! wins.

Sindik Ervin - Cebalo Miso (34.Qf6)

Also, 1 ed adds to the pressure, being near zugzwang, and White is winning.

Thanks to Chessbase 15’s auto-analysis graph which showed me there had been something a few moves before yesterday’s puzzle.

Capture

FEN

4kr2/1bR2p2/p2b4/1q1ppQ2/4P3/3P4/1N5P/1KR5 w – – 0 34

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the March 1979 Chess magaizine. I have hundreds (many hundreds) of magazines on my book shelves, and I thought I would dip into them; and thought I would start with this magazine from forty years back.

Magazine cover

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Sindik Ervin - Cebalo Miso (40...Kf8)

Sindik v Cebalo, Zagreb 1978

 

Solution

Seeing the geometry of the placement of the two queens, or by CJS Purdy’s technique of jump-biffs, it is clear that the Bd6 is pinned; and also, the Qb6 is tied to d8, else White would play Qd8 mate. So 1 Rb4! and Black’s position falls apart: 1-0.

Sindik Ervin - Cebalo Miso (41.Rb4)

FEN

5k2/1b3pr1/pq1b1Q2/4p3/2R1P2P/8/1N6/1K3R2 w – – 0 41

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

A third win in 2019 by Luke McShane: this mini-series done since the other day I searched on TWIC for Luke’s games as Black in 2019, to find his Saskirian win, and found that his score so far is -0 =6 +5.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play

Walton A - McShane L (43.a4)

Walton v McShane, Bunratty 22/2/2019

Solution

1…Ba4!

I wonder whether Luke was cool when playing this? No doubt he was, seeing it all to the end, but I would be so scared that I’d missed something.

2 Ba4 Kd3 3 Kg2 c2 4 Bc2+ Kc2 results in:

Walton A - McShane L (46...Kxc2)

and 5 Kh3 Kd3 6 Kh4 Ke2! and White resigned.

Walton A - McShane L (48...Ke2)

Bravo!

I don’t know how reliable Chessbase’s quick analysis graphs are, but below is the graph of this game, where Luke was pressing straight from the opening (a Trompovsky).

Capture

FEN

8/8/2b5/8/P2k1p2/2p2P2/2B2K2/8 b – – 0 43

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is another nice recent victory by Luke McShane.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play

Sarakauskas G - McShane L (21.Ne2)

Sarakauskas v McShane, 4NCL 17/3/19

 

Solution

1…f4! the idea of which is to divert the Bg3 from its square, so it can’t capture the Nh4

2 Nf4 Rf4! 3 Bf4[] Bg2!

Sarakauskas G - McShane L (23...Bxg2)

White captured the B, but Black forked K and Q, and soon mopped up.

The whole game- on TWIC- is worth playing through, to see how Luke (2661) outplayed a (for him) weaker player (2431) from a fairly level position.

Not many moves earlier, the position had been:

Sarakauskas G - McShane L (16.Nc3)

Luke lost the Pc7 by a tactic, but in compensation, Nd6-f4-h5 and f7-f5 gave him an awesome attack: this period of moves reminds me of the discussion in Game Changer by Matthew Sadler and Natasha Regan of AlphaZero’s sacrifices for time.

FEN

r4rk1/pb1qb1pp/1p6/2p2p2/7n/3PN1B1/PPPQNPPP/R3R1K1 b – – 0 21

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the recent World Teams Championships in which England won silver, and Luke McShane got gold on second board. Today is one of Luke’s games.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play: examine 1 e6 Qe6 2 Bc5, as played in the game

Sasikiran K - McShane L (29...c5)

Sasikirian v McShane, Astana 9th March 2019

Solution

Watching this game live, I felt it was quite level, but also realised I had no real idea what was going in this quiet Italian Opening game.  Pieces were juggled around, and I just hoped Luke would be safe, and hoped that he might make something of his passed c pawn.

Then, White played 1 e6 which really surprised me, until I saw the point: 1…fe? 2 Nf4, so 1…Qe6[] when 2 Bc5 snaffles the passed pawn.

But 2 Bc5?? since 2…Nc5 3 Nc5 Qe1+! 4 Kh2[] Qe5+ and the Nc5 falls: 0-1.

Sasikiran K - McShane L (33...Qe5+)

Every picture tells a story, and Chessbase 15’s auto-analysis of the game shows that, yes, indeed, the game was level-ish until the end.

Capture

FEN

6k1/1p3pp1/1P5p/2pqP3/2n1n3/3NB2P/2Q2PP1/6K1 w – – 0 30