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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the Candidates tournament.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Nepomniachtchi Ian - Ding Liren (34...Qxe2)
Nepomniachtchi v Ding FIDE Candidates Tournament, Yekaterinburg, 23/3/2020

Solution

The first move White could play is 1 R6b2, but 1…Qb2! is an easy-to-spot tactic, since the Rb1 is tied to the first rank.

The second move I looked at for White is 1 Rb8, but then the fantastic 1…Re5! holds the balance, due to the back rank mate threat.

Nepomniachtchi Ian - Ding Liren (35...Re5).jpg

White has to play Rd8+ Rh8+! Qc8+ Qh3 wjem je jas a Carlsenesque advanntage:

Nepomniachtchi Ian - Ding Liren (39.Qxh3+).jpg

 

FEN

3b2k1/5pp1/1RQ5/r7/3p4/3P2Pp/4qP1P/1R5K w – – 0 35

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the Candidates tournament.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play

Nepomniachtchi Ian - Ding Liren (33.Qc6).jpg
Nepomniachtchi v Ding FIDE Candidates Tournament, Yekaterinburg, 23/3/2020

Solution

Black played 1…Rc5 and soon lost, but 1…Rb6! 2 Rb6 Qe2! is equal. I’ll look at why tomorrow.

Nepomniachtchi Ian - Ding Liren (34...Qxe2).jpg

FEN

1r1b2k1/5pp1/1PQ5/r7/3p2q1/3P2Pp/1R2NP1P/1R5K b – – 0 33

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from an old edition of Chess Magazine. I don’t know which one, because, as is my habit, from time to time I photocopy a page to solve on walks or on trains etc; and my copy doesn’t show the magazine date.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Martin Julian - Lammers Markus (21...Rfd8).jpg

 

J Martin v M Lammers, Bundesliga 16/10/2016

 

Solution

A pretty one today: I found it pleasing that 1 Rcd2! is so powerful: the rook can’t be captured, because the Rd8 is tied to defending the Ra8. So 1…Rdb8 2 Bh6! and npw the Rb8 is tied to the back rank, so the queen can’t be captured.

Martin Julian - Lammers Markus (23.Bh6).jpg

 

 

FEN

r2r2k1/1Q2pp1p/6p1/p1P5/8/1P2B3/qbR2PPP/3R2K1 w – – 0 22

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from an old edition of Chess Magazine. I don’t know which one, because, as is my habit, from time to time I photocopy a page to solve on walks or on trains etc; and my copy doesn’t show the magazine date.

Black to play and draw

Fernandez Daniel Howard - Jackson James P (50.f4).jpg

 

Daniel Fernandez v J Jackson, Newport Pagnall 5/11/2016

Solution

Black played the move I would have played, 1…Ke2, and lost: a pawn queens.

But 1…Rb3 or, I suspect technically better, 1…Rb2 and check-check-check.

For instance, 1…Rb2 2 f5 Rg2+

Fernandez Daniel Howard - Jackson James P (51...Rg2+).jpg

and 3 Kf6 Rh2, or 3 Kh5 Rf2.

If I were playing either colour, I wouldn’t know the correct evaluation: I would be in “play and pray” mode, thinking I should have studied Dvortesky’s endgame manual. But by playing around on my laptop, always hitting the unprotected pawn, I can see that the harassment causes the position to be drawn.

 

FEN

8/8/1r5P/p5K1/P4P2/8/8/3k4 b – – 0 50

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from an old edition of Chess Magazine. I don’t know which one, because, as is my habit, from time to time I photocopy a page to solve on walks or on trains etc; and my copy doesn’t show the magazine date.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play: evaluate 1 Bf7+! Kf7

Flear Glenn C - Bhatia Kanwal K (20...Bxf3).jpg

 

Glenn Flear v K Bhatia, 4 NCL Reading 19/11/2016

Solution

Yesterday we saw the game continuation, 1… Rf7, which I find easy to compute. For some reason, I struggled more with 1…Kf7.

Eventually I saw 2 Re7+ Kg8[] and 3 Qh6 and it is game over.

Flear Glenn C - Bhatia Kanwal K (23.Qh6).jpg

I also found, and this is what took so much time, 3 f7+ Rf7[] 5 Re8+ Rf8[] 6 Rf8+ Kf8 7 Qf4+ and if 7…Kg8 8 Re1, with the threat of 9 Re8+ and 10 Qf8 mate, before deciding “long variation, bad variation” (it isn’t that bad: it wins) and taking a fresh look and seeing Qh6.

 

FEN

1n3rkb/r2p1p1p/5Pp1/2p5/2B5/q1B2b2/P2Q1PPP/R3R1K1 w – – 0 21

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from an old edition of Chess Magazine. I don’t know which one, because, as is my habit, from time to time I photocopy a page to solve on walks or on trains etc; and my copy doesn’t show the magazine date.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Flear Glenn C - Bhatia Kanwal K (20...Bxf3).jpg

 

Glenn Flear v K Bhatia, 4 NCL Reading 19/11/2016

Solution

1 Bf7+! was clearly the move, but finding why it worked took some effort. Today, I will deal with the move played in the game, 1….Rf7.

2 Re8+ Rf8[] 3 Rf8+ Kf8 4 Qd6+ forking the king and the LPDO Nb8: the point.

Flear Glenn C - Bhatia Kanwal K (24.Qd6+)

But better still, ┬áBlack is in a mating net, and after 4…Kg8 5 Qe7 decides: either mate by 6 f7, or 5…Bf6 6 Qf6, win.

 

FEN

1n3rkb/r2p1p1p/5Pp1/2p5/2B5/q1B2b2/P2Q1PPP/R3R1K1 w – – 0 21

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from an old edition of Chess Magazine. I don’t know which one, because, as is my habit, from time to time I photocopy a page to solve on walks or on trains etc; and my copy doesn’t show the magazine date.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play (find a move to play, but don’t spend too much time on the puzzle, for reasons which will be explained)

Pos225.jpg

 

M Carpenter v D Keddie, Huddersfield 2016

Solution

I failed with this puzzle; I would have played 1 e6 to free my black squared bishop and damage Black’s pawns, but I couldn’t see a path to an advantage.

Komodo took a long time -a few minutes on my very modern laptop before switching from 1 e6 +0.2 to 1 f4! +2.33; 1 f4 being the move played in the game. ┬áThe main line is seen after 1….Qe6 2 f5!

Pos226.jpg

2….gf 3 Qh4+ Kg8[] 4 Bf6!!

Pos227.jpg

Very unusual, very nice. The idea behind f4-f5 is therefore to remove the g6 pawn so that a later Qg5 comes with full force.

FEN

r4r1k/2pq1pp1/p1n3p1/b2pP1B1/B2P4/2p2PQP/P5P1/2R1R1K1 w – – 0 1