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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

Pos21

Orega v Valdes, date unknown

 

Solution

1 Nf7! Kf7[] 2 Be3! double attack, hitting the Qc5 and Ph7, and White mops up,

Pos22

FEN

r1br2k1/p3bp1p/4p1pB/1pqnN3/8/P2B3Q/1PP2PPP/3RR1K1 w – – 0 1

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

Pos16

Tal v a.n. other, USSR 1964

 

Solution

I missed Tal’s beautiful solution, but found a more prosaic one which Komodo says is just as good: 1 Qf8+ Kf6[] 2 Bd4+ and check, check, check and 1-0.

But 1 Bb6!!

Pos17

1…ab 2 Qd8 mate;

1…Qb6 2 Qh4+ Rf6 (2…f6 3 Qh7+ ) 3 Qb4+! and mates: 1…Qb6 removes the Black Queen’s protection of the Bb4.

Pos18

 

FEN

2R4Q/pp1bkp2/4p1r1/qN1p4/Pb6/4B3/1P3PPP/6K1 w – – 0 1

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play : examine 1 Rb5 fg, as played

Pos33

Hanninen v a.n.other, simul Helsinki 1957

 

Solution

1  Rb5! fg 2 Qf6+!!

Pos34

and if 2…Nf6 then 3 Rb8+ Kd7 4 Bc8+ and 5 Be6 mate.

Pos35

 

FEN

3k4/p2n3r/B1pP2p1/2q1rp2/6P1/2P2Q2/P1P2P2/1R1R2K1 w – – 0 1

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s puzzle is a change from the normal, inspired by a tweet by Olimpiu Orcan-see my posting of 7th February 2018.
On an occasional basis I will post a challenge to see if reader’s can spot the games which had particular moves.
Puzzle
Which famous game had   24 Ba7!!   in it?
Solution
Karpov Anatoly - Unzicker Wolfgang (24.Ba7)
Karpov v Unzicker, Nice Olympiad 17.6.1974.
I remember seeing this game in British Chess Magazine at the time, and being stunned by it.

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s puzzle is a change from the normal, inspired by a tweet by Olimpiu Orcan-see my posting of 7th February 2018.
On an occasional basis I will post a challenge to see if reader’s can spot the games which had particular moves.
Puzzle
Which famous game had   22 Rf7!!  in it?
Solution
Wei Yi - Bruzon Batista Lazaro (22.Rxf7!!)

Wei Yi v Bruzon Batista, Danzhou 3/7/2015

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play: examine 1 Rd6 Rf6 2 Rd8+ Rf8 1/2-1/2, as played in the game

Pos14

Ivanov v Dimitrov Sofia 1957

Solution

Alas, White missed 1 Qh8+! (or 3 Qh8+, or even 2 Qh8+) mating.

Pos15

FEN

3R1rk1/p5p1/1p4q1/n4pN1/7Q/2p4P/2P2P2/6K1 w – – 0 1

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

Portisch Lajos - Berger Bela (15...Nd8)

Portisch v Bergerm Amsterdam 19.6.1964

 

Solution

1 Nh7! Kh7[] 2 Rh5+ Kg7[] (2…Kg8 3 Qg6 mate) 3 Be5+ f6 4 Rg5! 1-0

Portisch Lajos - Berger Bela (19.Rg5)

FEN

r1bn1rk1/pp3p1p/6p1/2bR2N1/2B2B2/q1P1P3/2Q2PPP/4K2R w K – 0 16