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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play: evaluate 1…Rc5 2 Nf4, as played in the game

Pos65.jpg

Bhend v Senn, Zurich 1956

 

Solution

1…Rc5 2 Nf4 Rc2!

Pos66.jpg

If 3 Ng6? Black mates with Rg2+ and Rg4+; so 3 Rf2 Rf2! 4 Ng6 Rg2+ 5 Kf1[] Rg6 -+

Better is 4 Kf2 Qh6 5 Qh6 gh[] 6 Ne6 and the game isn’t totally over (unless White is Carlsen, in which case it was much earlier).

Pos67

FEN

1n4k1/1b3rpp/p1r1p1q1/1pB1Pp2/3P3Q/3NP3/1PP3PP/R4RK1 w – – 0 1

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play: yesterday, the solution was given as 1 Ne6 fe 2 Rc7+, exchange on h8, and promote or win the exchange. What was wrong with that solution?Szabo Laszlo - Dozsa Paul (37...dxe5)

 

Szabo v Dozsa, Budapest 28/5/1962

Solution

1..Ne4! and the game is equal: 2 Rc7 Kg8 and White can’t progress.

The book doesn’t mention this cook, so I wonder if the players, or Richter, knew?

Szabo Laszlo - Dozsa Paul (38...Nxe4).jpg

FEN

7r/5p1k/4N1p1/3Pp1P1/p3P3/Pp4n1/1P6/1KR5 b – – 0 38

Daily Chess Puzzl

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

Szabo Laszlo - Dozsa Paul (37...dxe5)

Szabo v Dozsa, Budapest 28/5/1962

Solution

1 Ne6! fe 2 Rc7+, 3 Rc8+, 4 Rh8 and either the d-pawn queens, or White is an exchange up, with a winning advantage.

Szabo Laszlo - Dozsa Paul (41.Rxh8)

If 1…Re8 (which is better than 1…fe) then 2 Nc5 or 2 Rc7, and White is better.

I will return to this problem tomorrow.

FEN

7r/5p1k/6p1/3Pp1P1/p3PN2/Pp4n1/1P6/1KR5 w – – 0 38

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play

Pos63

Balogh v Pogats, Budapest 1957

Solution

1…Qg3! and White’s position collapses.

2 hg Rf1+ 3 Kh2[] Ne1 and the game is over.

Pos64

If 4 Qb4 (say) Black has a mate by 4…Rh1+ 5 Kg4 h5 mate.

 

FEN

5rk1/pp5p/4p1p1/4P3/2pP2q1/3nPrN1/PP1Q2RP/5RK1 b – – 0 1

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

Pos57

Taimanov v AN Other, simul USSR 1964

Solution

The finale of yesterday’s puzzle: 1 Rf8+!! Rf8[] 2 Rg6+ and mate next move.

Pos58

FEN

2r1r2k/6Rp/p5p1/2p1B3/8/8/1Pq3PP/5RK1 w – – 0 4

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

Pos55

Taimanov v AN Other, simul USSR 1964

 

Solution

1 Bc4! Qc4[]

2 Rg7+! Kh8 (if 2…Kg7, 3 Be5+ wins the queen)

Pos56

3 Be5! flashy, and wins, though the engines say Rb7 or Ra7 is ‘better’ (in the sense 12>6) Qc2 (3…Qf1+ also loses, prosaically).

Pos57

and the finale will be tomrrow’s puzzle.

FEN

2r1r1k1/1R4bp/p5p1/2pqn3/8/2B5/1PQ1B1PP/5RK1 w – – 0 1

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

A very nice, pretty, problem, ┬áto celebrate my wife’s birthday. Not that she understands how to play chess, that is.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play:

and which of White’s pieces wins the game? Name that piece.

Pos39

Stulik v Kozma, Czechoslovakia 1957

 

Solution

1 Kg4! Qb2 – hitting f6, in time to prevent Rgh3 and Rh8 mate.

2 Rgh3! anyway Qf6[]

Pos40

3 e5!! and Black doesn’t have a check, since the Bb1 covers f5, and the Pd5 covers e6.

3…de[] 4 Rh8+! Qh8[] (else 5 R1h7 mate) 5 Rh8 Kh8[] 6 d6 and promotes, since the Bb1 prevents the N coming back to e4 and then f6 with check.

Pos41

Almost a study. I bet Mr Stulik went home happy that evening, and Mr Kozma was consoled by losing to such a fine combination.

 

FEN

6k1/5p2/3p1Pp1/3P4/1qp1PP2/6RK/3n4/1B5R w – – 0 1