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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play: analyse 1 Kf1, as played in the game

Pos132

Farbood v Panno, Varna Olympiad 19. 9. 1962

Solution

1…Qh4! 0-1. Mate follows either by  2…Qf2 if 2 Kg2 Nf4+ 3 Kg1 Qg4+ etc.

Pos133

FEN

r2q3k/1p3rb1/6p1/p1Np3P/3p4/PP1P1N1n/4PP2/2RQRK2 b – – 0 27

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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play: analyse 1…Qb6, as played in the game

Pos130

Platz v Lampe, Halle 1955

Solution

1…Qb6?? loses 2 Qf6+! which mates by force. 2…Kf6 3 Rf1+ and 4 Bg5 mate.

Pos131

FEN

1r1qr3/5k1p/p2p1ppB/2N1p3/1p4P1/1P6/PP3Q1P/K2R4 b – – 0 1

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play

Pos127

unknown players, 1944

Solution

1…Rc7!! (though my engine says 1…Rh8 is also equal).

2 b5!! =

Pos128

2…Qd1+! 3 Rd1[] Rb7

Pos129

FEN

2r5/1Q1R3p/1p4pk/7q/1P3P2/B3n3/7P/7K b – – 0 1

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s position is a ‘classic’ which I have only recently come across.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

Pos124

Kholmov v Bronstein, Kiev 23/1/1965

Solution

1 Nc6!!

Pos125

1…Nc6[] 2 e5!

Pos126

with the aim of opening up the d3-h7 diagonal. Bronstein played 2…Bg5+ (followed by 3…f6); Kholmov’s analysis suggests 2..Ne5! leads to a position in which White is only better, but better; but the sheer beauty of Nc6 and e5 are hard to beat.

Megabase 2018 has detailed analysis.

FEN

r1b2r1k/4qp1p/p2ppb1Q/4nP2/1p1NP3/2N5/PPP4P/2KR1BR1 w – – 0 18

Daily Chess Puzzle

A challenging problem which I saw in a recent edition of Chess Today. I only partially solved it, which means I didn’t solve it at all.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play

Pos121

Vasquez v Van Riemsdijk, Sao Paulo 1972

Solution

1…Bd5! is the ‘obvious’ first move, though I spent time deciding between it and 1….Ba4 (which is nowhere near as good, because of 2 Be4! protecting the Rb1) 2 Rb2[] Bb2 3 Rc2

Pos122

and here I missed the winning line: 3…Bc6! 4 Rc6[] Bf6! 5 Ba3[] Be7! and it is game over. Lovely.

Pos123

FEN

1r4k1/4Bpbp/2B3p1/p7/8/1b2P3/1r3PPP/1RR3K1 b – – 0 25

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from a recent game, the position being the puzzle from Ray Keene’s column in the Times. It took me a while to solve, and made me smile when I did, so I felt it worth sharing.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

Pos119.jpg

Korobov v Adly, Abu Dhabi 11/8/18

 

Solution

1 Rc7+! is the natural try, seeing that the Qd8 is tied to defending f8: 1…Qc7 2 Qf8 mate.

But what after 1…Kg8?  This took me a while.

Pos120

2 Ne7+! 1-0, since Black either loses the exchange, or his Bb7 is LPDO. And after 3 Rb7, it is fairly easy to see that White can untangle, after which it is a trivial win.

Nice.

FEN

1n1q4/1b3kr1/1p2ppN1/pP1p2p1/3P2P1/Q2BP3/P4PK1/2R5 w – – 0 28

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

Pos117

Lapiken v Reshevsky, Long Beach 11/8/1955

 

Solution

White played 1 Kb1 and the game was eventually drawn. But 1 Bc4!! wins: 1…Qc4+ 2 b3 and the double attack on the Q and the threat of Qh6+/Qh8 mate wins the game.

Pos118

FEN

r4r2/4ppBk/p2pq1p1/1p5n/4P2P/P4P2/KPPQ4/3R1BR1 w – – 0 20

Footnote

The game was an exciting Sicilian Dragon; worth playing through in full. It is in Megabase.