Skip to content

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the January 1979 Chess magazine. I have hundreds (many hundreds) of magazines on my book shelves, and I thought I would dip into them; and thought I would start with going forty years back.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Pos138

Prandsetter v Jankovec, MarinskeLazne 1978

Solution

1 Qb6! and either the rook reaches d7 with devastation, or White is a pawn up, with an attack.

Pos139

FEN

r1r5/1p3k1p/pn2pPpB/2q5/1Q6/2P5/P1P3PP/3R1R1K w – – 0 1

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the April 1979 Chess magazine. I have hundreds (many hundreds) of magazines on my book shelves, and I thought I would dip into them; and thought I would start with going forty years back.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play

Pribyl Josef - Peev Peicho Chonev (19.Qc3)

Pribyl v Peev, Decin 9th June 1978

Solution

1…Ba6+ 2 Ke1 Qg5 0-1

Pribyl Josef - Peev Peicho Chonev (20...Qxg5)

If 3 Ba8 then 3…Qg1+ and mates.

FEN

r1b1k1r1/3n1p1p/1p1Ppq1b/p5N1/3P4/2Q5/PPP2NBP/R4K1R b q – 0 19

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the April 1979 Chess magazine. I have hundreds (many hundreds) of magazines on my book shelves, and I thought I would dip into them; and thought I would start with going forty years back.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Mariotti Sergio - Panchenko Alexander N (47...Rxd5)

Mariotti v Panchenko, Las Palmas 1978

 

Solution

1 Rb6! and White mates after 1..Qb6 2 Qh8+ Kg6 3 Bh5; interposing 1…Rd6 just adds a further move.

Mariotti Sergio - Panchenko Alexander N (50.Bh5#)

FEN

2Q5/1R6/5q1k/3rnpp1/1P2p3/6P1/4BPK1/8 w – – 0 48

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the April 1979 Chess magazine. I have hundreds (many hundreds) of magazines on my book shelves, and I thought I would dip into them; and thought I would start with going forty years back.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play, after White played 1 Qf5

Titov German - Kovalev Andrei (20...Rg8)

Titov v Kovalev, Tashkent September 1978

Solution

1…Rg2+ 2 Kf1 Rg1+! 0-1

Titov German - Kovalev Andrei (22...Rg1+)

White must capture, when 3…Rg2+ 4 Kf1 Ba6+ overloads the Nd4 (and also mates).

FEN

r5rk/pb2p2p/5p1R/4q3/3N2Q1/8/PP3PPP/R5K1 w – – 0 21

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the June 1979 Chess magazine. I have hundreds (many hundreds) of magazines on my book shelves, and I thought I would dip into them; and thought I would start with going forty years back.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Before I give the puzzle, the June 1979 Chess magazine might have been the first time Garry Kasparov came to the attention of Chess magazine readers.

cover

None of Garry’s games are in the magazine, though.

 

White to play

Espig Lutz - Inkiov Ventzislav (53...Kf8)

Espig v Inkiov, Varna 15/5/1976

Solution

1 f7! and after 1…Kf7 (1…Kg7 or 1…Ke7 are both met by 2 Kf6 and wins trivially) 2 Kf5 and White wins, with the opposition.

Espig Lutz - Inkiov Ventzislav (55.Kf5)

White shoulders the Black king away from its protection of the Pd6.

FEN

5k2/8/3p1P2/p1pP2K1/P1P5/8/8/8 w – – 0 54

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the January 1979 Chess magazine. I have hundreds (many hundreds) of magazines on my book shelves, and I thought I would dip into them; and thought I would start with going forty years back.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play

Pos147

Abbott v McGowan, Southend Easter 1979

Solution

1…Qh2+ 2 Kf1[] Qh1+! and mate next move.

Pos148

FEN

r1b2k2/pp5r/3p3q/1QpPpNp1/P1P1PnP1/2P2P2/5RB1/1R4K1 b – – 0 1

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the June 1979 Chess magazine. I have hundreds (many hundreds) of magazines on my book shelves, and I thought I would dip into them; and thought I would start with going forty years back.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play: how should White have played?

Pos133

Lemachko v Caldwell, Hyeres April 1979

 

Solution

White could have won by 1 b6! (or 1 Kg2 or even 2 Kh2, wins, too)

1…a4 2 c6 a3 3 cb a2 4 b8(Q) a1(Q)

Pos135

5 Kg2 (best, defending the f2 pawn) Qd4

Pos136.jpg

And my engine says it is mate in 33; but what matters is 6 Qd6+ Ke8 7 e6 and the Queen has sight of important squares around the White’s king, such as g3, so the checks can be shielded: and pawns pushed.

Pos137

FEN

8/1p2k3/8/pPPpPp2/3P4/8/5P2/7K w – – 0 1