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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the C.H.O’D. Alexander’s 1973 book”The Penguin Book of Chess Positions”, a book I devoured (and loved) as a child.

I thought I would use it for more of my daily training.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Taimanov Mark E - Huebner Robert (37...Ne3+)

Taimanov v Huebner, Palma de Mallorca 13/11/1970

 

Solution

The position reached at the end of yesterday’s line.

Now 1 Kf3 Nd1[] 2 c4 traps the N, which is captured after 3 Ke2

Taimanov should have taken the Pf6 in yesterday’s position; he didn’t, and the game was instead drawn.

Taimanov Mark E - Huebner Robert (39.c4)

FEN

4k3/p7/1p3B2/2p2P2/7p/2P1n3/6KP/3R4 w – – 0 38

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the C.H.O’D. Alexander’s 1973 book”The Penguin Book of Chess Positions”, a book I devoured (and loved) as a child.

I thought I would use it for more of my daily training.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play: examine 1 Bf6

Taimanov Mark E - Huebner Robert (34...Ke8)

Taimanov v Huebner, Palma 13/11/1970

 

Solution

Taimanov didn’t play 1 Bf6, because of 1…Rg2+ 2 Rg2[] Rg2+ 3 Kg2 Ne3+

Taimanov Mark E - Huebner Robert (37...Ne3+)

More tomorrow on this.

FEN

4k3/p5R1/1p3p2/2p2PB1/2n4p/2P5/r3r1PP/3R2K1 w – – 0 35

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the C.H.O’D. Alexander’s 1973 book”The Penguin Book of Chess Positions”, a book I devoured (and loved) as a child.

I thought I would use it for more of my daily training.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

 

Black to play

Tartakower Saviely - Euwe Max (39.Ka3)

Tartakower v Euwe, Venice 1948

Solution

1…Nc4+! exploiting the fork 2 bc[] Ra4+ decoying the K out from cover 3 Kb4[] Qb2+ skewering the K and LPDO Q.

Tartakower Saviely - Euwe Max (42...Qb2+)

The Megabase quick analysis graph shows that the game was fairly topsy-turvy:

Capture

 

FEN

r7/1p3k2/1Qpn1p2/8/P3b3/KPP5/3q1P2/2R3R1 b – – 0 39

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the C.H.O’D. Alexander’s 1973 book”The Penguin Book of Chess Positions”, a book I devoured (and loved) as a child.

I thought I would use it for more of my daily training.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Pachman Ludek - Gunnarsson Gunnar K (25...Rfd7)

 

Pachman v Gunnatsson, 4/2/1967 Vrnjacka Banja

 

Solution

1 Rdd7+! Rd7[] 2 Qb5! 1-0

Pachman Ludek - Gunnarsson Gunnar K (27.Qb5)

There is an optical illusion here: 1 Rcd7 looks just as good, with the same idea, 1….Rd7[] 2Qb5 but, oops!, 2…Re7! and the same pin-based trick doesn’t work. White would have to rely on winning the rook ending after exchanging queens, checking and capturing the Pb7.

 

FEN

3rq3/ppRr2kp/3Rp1p1/4Pp2/2Q2P2/1P6/P5PP/6K1 w – – 0 26

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the C.H.O’D. Alexander’s 1973 book”The Penguin Book of Chess Positions”, a book I devoured (and loved) as a child.

I thought I would use it for more of my daily training.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Eliskases Erich Gottlieb - Hoelzl (42...Be4)

Eliskases v Hoelzl, Innsbruck 23/9/1929

Solution

1 Re5! a nice decoy/overload. 1-0.

Eliskases Erich Gottlieb - Hoelzl (43.Re5)

Strangely, 1 Re5! is Komodo’s third best choice. It favours 1 Rd5! which is mate in 7; or 1 Qf7 which is mate in 9; to 1 Re5, which apparently is only mate in 10. I haven’t bothered/won’t check these “mates in”, though I was pleased to find both 1 Re5 and 1 Rd5, the latter being in my view prettier.

FEN

3r3k/4Qp1p/p3p3/1pR4P/3qb3/P5R1/1P3PP1/6K1 w – – 0 43

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the C.H.O’D. Alexander’s 1973 book”The Penguin Book of Chess Positions”, a book I devoured (and loved) as a child.

I thought I would use it for more of my daily training.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Zukertort Johannes Hermann - Englisch Berthold (46...Ke8)

Zukertort v Englisch London 21/5/1883

 

Solution

1 Qb5! Qb5[] 2 c8(Q)+ Kf7[] 3 Qe6+!

Zukertort Johannes Hermann - Englisch Berthold (49.Qxe6+)

3…Ke6[] 4 Nc7+ Ke5 5 Nb5

Zukertort Johannes Hermann - Englisch Berthold (51.Nxb5)

and White managed to win: see Megabase for the remainder of the game.

FEN

4k3/p1P3p1/2q1np1p/3N4/8/1Q3PP1/6KP/8 w – – 0 47

Daily Chess Puzzle: 50 years ago, today

Today’s problem is from the C.H.O’D. Alexander’s 1973 book”The Penguin Book of Chess Positions”, a book I devoured (and loved) as a child.

I thought I would use it for more of my daily training.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Sanner Michel - Saint Bonnet Guy (23...Re8 )

Sanner M v G St Bonnet, Pau 4th Sept 1969

 

Solution

1 Qf6! and wins: the Pe7 is pinned to the LPDO Re8, so Black is mated or loses his queen,

Sanner Michel - Saint Bonnet Guy (24.Qxf6 )

FEN

2R1r1k1/pp2pr1p/4QnpB/8/3q4/8/P4PPP/4R1K1 w – – 0 24