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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from an old edition of Chess Magazine. I don’t know which one, because, as is my habit, from time to time I photocopy a page to solve on walks or on trains etc; and my copy doesn’t show the magazine date.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Flear Glenn C - Bhatia Kanwal K (20...Bxf3).jpg

 

Glenn Flear v K Bhatia, 4 NCL Reading 19/11/2016

Solution

1 Bf7+! was clearly the move, but finding why it worked took some effort. Today, I will deal with the move played in the game, 1….Rf7.

2 Re8+ Rf8[] 3 Rf8+ Kf8 4 Qd6+ forking the king and the LPDO Nb8: the point.

Flear Glenn C - Bhatia Kanwal K (24.Qd6+)

But better still, ┬áBlack is in a mating net, and after 4…Kg8 5 Qe7 decides: either mate by 6 f7, or 5…Bf6 6 Qf6, win.

 

FEN

1n3rkb/r2p1p1p/5Pp1/2p5/2B5/q1B2b2/P2Q1PPP/R3R1K1 w – – 0 21

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from an old edition of Chess Magazine. I don’t know which one, because, as is my habit, from time to time I photocopy a page to solve on walks or on trains etc; and my copy doesn’t show the magazine date.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play (find a move to play, but don’t spend too much time on the puzzle, for reasons which will be explained)

Pos225.jpg

 

M Carpenter v D Keddie, Huddersfield 2016

Solution

I failed with this puzzle; I would have played 1 e6 to free my black squared bishop and damage Black’s pawns, but I couldn’t see a path to an advantage.

Komodo took a long time -a few minutes on my very modern laptop before switching from 1 e6 +0.2 to 1 f4! +2.33; 1 f4 being the move played in the game. ┬áThe main line is seen after 1….Qe6 2 f5!

Pos226.jpg

2….gf 3 Qh4+ Kg8[] 4 Bf6!!

Pos227.jpg

Very unusual, very nice. The idea behind f4-f5 is therefore to remove the g6 pawn so that a later Qg5 comes with full force.

FEN

r4r1k/2pq1pp1/p1n3p1/b2pP1B1/B2P4/2p2PQP/P5P1/2R1R1K1 w – – 0 1

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the Candidates tournament.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play: Ding played 1 Rdd2 and lost; if instead 1 d4 cd, then what?

Ding Liren - Wang Hao (39...Rd7).jpg

Ding v Wang FIDE Candidates Tournament, Yekaterinburg, 17/3/2020

Solution

1 d4! cd (1…Rd4 was considered yesterday) 2 Rc2!! a move I wouldn’t have seen.

Ding Liren - Wang Hao (41.Rc2!)

 

 

FEN

3b4/3r2p1/1p2k1r1/pPp1Pp1p/P4P1P/3PNK2/R7/3R4 w – – 0 40

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the Candidates tournament.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play: Ding played 1 Rdd2 and lost; what should he have played?

Ding Liren - Wang Hao (39...Rd7).jpg

Ding v Wang FIDE Candidates Tournament, Yekaterinburg, 17/3/2020

Solution

1 d4! a move I would perhaps have seen, but then rejected because of 1…Rd4 2 Rd4 cd 3 Nc2 Kd5.

Ding Liren - Wang Hao (42...Kd5)

But then 4 Nd4! with the point that 4…Kd4 is met by 5 Rd2+ skewering the King and LPDO Bd8.

Ding Liren - Wang Hao (45.Rxd8)

 

FEN

3b4/3r2p1/1p2k1r1/pPp1Pp1p/P4P1P/3PNK2/R7/3R4 w – – 0 40

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the Octoer 1979 edition of Chess Magazine. I’ve gone back down memory lane, and enjoyed reading about the then stars, and future ones such as Short and Kasparov.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play

Bouaziz Slim - Miles Anthony John (45.c7)

 

S Bouaziz v Tony Miles, Rigs Interzonal 11/9/1979

Solution

A well know classic turnaroud: Tony saved a lost position, and even won after1…Rh3!; White’s previous move, 1 c7, was the losing blunder.

After 1…Rh3, White’s King is dragged into the open:

Bouaziz Slim - Miles Anthony John (49...Bxg5+).jpg

the end position

The Chessbase graph shows the story:

Capture

 

FEN

5bk1/2P2pp1/p7/8/1p4Pp/5P1P/P1RR1QK1/1q5r b – – 0 45

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the Octoer 1979 edition of Chess Magazine. I’ve gone back down memory lane, and enjoyed reading about the then stars, and future ones such as Short and Kasparov.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play

Watson William N - Hillyard Graham D (27.Bg3)

 

William Watson v Graham Hillyard, Lloyds Bank Open 1979

Solution

1…Rh2 is the obvious move, only obvious because it is a puzzle position. White resigned after 2 cb+ Kb7 3 Qc3 Qh5.

Watson William N - Hillyard Graham D (29...Qh5)

 

FEN

2kr3r/1p3p2/pPP1pp2/3q4/3P1b2/P4PB1/1Q3P1P/R4RK1 b – – 0 27

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the Octoer 1979 edition of Chess Magazine. I’ve gone back down memory lane, and enjoyed reading about the then stars, and future ones such as Short and Kasparov.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Pos224

 

Andrew Law v van Dijk, Lloyds Bank Masters 1979

Solution

Andrew played 1 Bf4+! and Komodo tells me it is mate in 11; I think equally good, though Komodo says is only +26, was the move I decided upon, 1 h3. Both have the same idea, of preventing …Qg4 (though 1 h3 does permit the suicidal …Qd4-g4).

 

 

FEN

1r4k1/3bpp1p/p1R5/4PPB1/1r1q4/6Q1/P5PP/2R4K w – – 0 1

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the Octoer 1979 edition of Chess Magazine. I’ve gone back down memory lane, and enjoyed reading about the then stars, and future ones such as Short and Kasparov.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play

Pos220

 

 

Solution

1…Re3! ‘trapping’ the knight

Pos222.jpg

2 Kh5[] Kg7 3 h4 h6 winning the piece.

Pos223.jpg

In the game, Black missed 1…Re3, and the game was drawn.

FEN

6k1/7p/8/6N1/6PK/1r5P/8/8 b – – 0 1

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the Octoer 1979 edition of Chess Magazine. I’ve gone back down memory lane, and enjoyed reading about the then stars, and future ones such as Short and Kasparov.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Pos218

 

Halikyan v Hanov, Spartakiad 1979

Solution

1 Bh6! and if 1…Kh6 2 Qh8 mate.

Pos219

 

FEN

8/q4p1k/4pQp1/p1p1P1Bp/4N2P/P7/5PPK/3r4 w – – 0 1

Daily Chess Puzzle

One from the archives, in “Woodpecker” fashion: I have blogged about it before, but a repeat does no harm.

White to play and win

Capture.JPG

 

Solution

See here for the solution.