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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from another game between Darga and Spassky.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

Pos203

Spassky v Darga, Beverwijk, 1967

Solution

1 Ng6! fg[] 2 Bd5 and Black’s pawns are disrupted.

A nice petite combination.

The Queen is LPDO and the Pe6 pinned because of the threatened jump-biff.

Pos204

FEN

5rk1/1prnqpp1/p3p2p/P2nN3/3P4/1B5P/1P2QPP1/R2R2K1 w – – 0 21

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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is another game between yesterday’s players, found when finding yesterday’s game in Megabase.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

Pos200.jpg

 

Spassky v Darga, Varna 1962

 

Solution

1 Ne6! fe[] 2 Qa4+ Qb5 3 Qg4 and Black is in a losing bind.

Pos201

3…Qc6 4 Qg7 Rf8 5 Rf8+ Bg8[] 6 Qh7

Pos202

6..Rc8 7 Qg6+ Ke7[] and resigns, because 8 Rd6 wins, as does 8 Qf6+, and the computer’s preference 8 b4: the idea of b4 is that Black is in zugzwang.

FEN

r3kb1r/1q3ppp/p3p3/4P3/p2N1Q2/P7/1PP3PP/3R1R1K b kq – 0 20

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play: examine 1 Kb7 Bd3 2 Kc8 Be2 3 Kd8

Pos198.jpg

Darga v Spassky, Amsterdam 1964

Solution

3 Kd8?? would have been a blunder, and in the game White spotted why before playing it, playing 3 Kb7 and retracing his king’s steps.

Pos198

3…Bc4! and if 4 Bc4, stalemate.

Pos199

Darga managed to beat Spassky after another 30 moves.

 

FEN

8/8/1K1k2p1/2pP1pP1/2P2P2/1B6/4b3/8 w – – 0 64

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

Pos196

Krahnstover v Seyferth, Bitterfeld 1957

 

Solution

1 Qf6! which should be drawn, after either capture on f6:

Pos197

but Black played 1…Kg8?? and lost after 2 Qg6.

FEN

7k/6q1/6r1/7K/6pP/6P1/5Q2/8 w – – 0 1

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play: examine 1 c4, as played in the game

Pos195

Bilek v Heidenfeld, Lugano Olympiad 18/10/1958

 

Solution

1 c4?? Qg3+! 1/2-1/2

FEN

6q1/8/2PQ4/8/8/1KP5/8/7k w – – 0 128

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

Pos194

Pilnick v Reshevsky, New York 1942

 

Solution

1 Qf2 1/2-1/2

An easy one today.

Surprisingly, in the book, Black’s pawns are on c4 and e4 and not on g4 and h4. Most odd. My position is from Megabase.

FEN

8/kp6/p7/P4Q2/6pp/4q3/8/7K w – – 0 93

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play, after Nd3+ Ke3[] in yesterday’s game

 

Pos192

O’Sullivan v Walsh, Leinster 1952

Solution

1..f2 2 Nf3! []

2…Kg3

3 Nd2 Nc5

4 Ke2 Kg2

Pos193

and a later Ne4 or Nb3 will prise the N away from f1.

 

FEN

8/8/8/8/6kN/3nKp2/8/8 b – – 0 2