Skip to content

Daily Chess Puzzle: Nigel Short

A change, for a few days, to celebrate and wish my old school mate Nigel Short success in his candidacy for FIDE President.

Rather than give a puzzle, today I will provide a link to one of my old blog postings, which gave my game of the year 2016, Nigel Short v Fabiano Caruana.

Advertisements

Daily Chess Puzzle: Nigel Short

A change, for a few days, to celebrate and wish my old school mate Nigel Short success in his candidacy for FIDE President.

Rather than give a puzzle, today I will provide a link to one of my old blog postings which has a puzzle from one of Nigel’s games.

Daily Chess Puzzle: Nigel Short

A change, for a few days, to celebrate and wish my old school mate Nigel Short success in his candidacy for FIDE President.

Rather than give a puzzle, today I will provide a link to one of my old blog postings about a game of Nigel’s which I found very instructive.  I have looked back at it a few times over the years, and even, during 2018, played a game in which to some extent I benefitted from the lessons it provided me.

 

 

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

1

Petrosian v Simagin, Moscow October 1956

 

Solution

A well known position;  with a beautiful finish which has occasionally recurred in other games.

1 Qa8+! 2 Qh8+!! and the K-Q are skewered, so 2…Kh8[] 3 Nf7+ is a winning fork.

2

FEN

5k2/p4r1p/3q4/2p1p1N1/P1P5/8/6QB/7K w – – 0 44

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play: position after Rd8-Rd6

8

Lundholm v Aurell, Stockholm 1957

 

Solution

I would likely always play 1 Nd6 Qd6 “and hope”. The engines show 2 Rde2! with the idea of 3 Nf7!! – I wonder if any of my readers saw this?

Better than 1 Nd6 though is 1 Nf3!!: again, I wonder who saw this. I didn’t, and it took me a moment to see its point: 1…c5 would mean that the Qb4 no longer protects the Rd6, so the Rd6 becomes LPDO, and 2 Nd6 wins it for free.

FEN

6k1/1p4Pp/2pr4/p3N3/Pq1bNP2/7P/1P1R2RK/8 w – – 0 4

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

evaluate 1 f6 Be4

3

Lundholm v Aurell, Stockholm 1957

 

Solution

Continuing yesterday’s problem 1 f6 Be4 2 fg+ Kg8[] 3 Ne4:

6

I found thinking about the follow up to this position hard to discern in my head from the opening position, thinking that maybe Black was better, if he survives, and I thought he did survive, not seeing a win. I also presumed that 3..Qe7 was forced, defending f6, because if 3…Rd6 4 Nd6. I  will return to this tomorrow.

I think the evaluation for human purposes is unclear, but the engines show White is better, perhaps winning. The longer I leave Komodo 10 running, the higher its assessment; I suspect AlphaZero would show White is winning. After 3…Qe7 4 Rg5! is best; and is a move I might not have thought about.

7

Even the idea of 4 Rg5! wasn’t obvious to me.

Query: what is the idea behind 4 Rg5

Solution

4 Rg5 plans Ne5-g4 heading for either f6 or h6; the rook move ensures the Ng4 doesn’t block the rooks protection of the Pg7.

 

FEN

3r3k/1p4rp/2p5/p2bNP2/Pq1bQP2/2N4P/1P1R2RK/8 w – – 0 1

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

evaluate 1 f6 Rg2+ 2 Rg2 Bc3

3

Lundholm v Aurell, Stockholm 1957

Solution

This was hard for my to visualise. Too many pieces en pris, centralised, LPDO…but I got there, more or less.

1 f6 Rg2+ 2 Rg2[] Bc3:

4

3 Qh7+!! Kh7 4 Rg7+ Kh6[] (4…Kh8 5 Ng6 mate)

5

and now it is perpetual by repeated rook checks.

FEN

3r3k/1p4rp/2p5/p2bNP2/Pq1bQP2/2N4P/1P1R2RK/8 w – – 0 1