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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the current European Team Championships.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play: how to defend? What happens after (say) 1 Ra1

5

 

Ami v McShane, European Team Championships, Batumi, Georgia, 27th October 2019

Solution

If 1 Ra1, then 1…Be6 is strong, netting a pawn, with a continuing attack. It might objectivrly be best.

But 1…Re6!? 2 de Bc6! might be better.

8

As Matthew Sadler and Natasha Regan have pointed out in Game Changer, one of the things to be learnt from AlphaZero is the impact of cross-fire: from the rook/queen onto g2 via the g-line, and also on g2 along the long diagonal from the Bc6.

I suspect best for White now is 3 Be4 but after 3…Qe6 the Be4 is pinned to the LPDO Qe2. I prefer Black as a result.

FEN

4r1qk/p2b2rp/1p1pN3/3P4/P1Pp1pnb/3B4/1P1BQ1PP/4RR1K w – – 0 34

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the current European Team Championships.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play

3

 

Erwin L’Ami v Luke McShane European Team Championships, Batumi, Georgia, 27th October 2019

Solution

As so often in chess, “reverse the moves” or, “if you see one good more, look for another” applies here.

Rather than 1…Qe6 as discussed yesterday, followed by 2…Nf2+; 1…Nf2+ is devastating. 2 Kg1[] Rg2+ 3 Kf1[] Rg1+ 4 Ke2[] (4 Kf2 Qg2 mate)

4

and Black collects the house.

FEN

6qk/p5rp/1p1pQ3/8/P1Pp1Bn1/3B4/1P4PP/4R2K b – – 0 37

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the current European Team Championships.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play

1.JPG

 

Erwin L’Ami v Luke McShane, European Team Championships, Batumi, Georgia, 27th October 2019

Solution

1…Re6! which at first glance doesn’t seem possible, but if 2 Qe6 Qe6 3 Re6[] Nf2+ picks up the LPDO Bd3: 4 Kg1 Nd3

2.JPG

Having said this, the resultant position after 5 Bd6 doesn’t seem clearly better for Black to me; and in fact I prefer White.

What had I missed, but Luke had seen? Part of my analysis is wrong: answer tomorrow.

FEN

4r1qk/p5rp/1p1pP3/8/P1Pp1Bn1/3B4/1P2Q1PP/4R2K b – – 0 36

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the current European Team Championships.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play

6

 

Erwin L’Ami v Luke McShane European Team Championships, Batumi, Georgia, 27th October 2019

Solution

My move of the day from this round of the European Team Championships.

Luke played 1…Nf6! sacrificing the g-pawn, a move I wouldn’t ave considered. But, just like AlphaZero, the loss of a pawn equals an open line to attack: Black can put his R and Q on g7 and g8, bearing down on g2.

Erwin took the Pg5, and my engine says White is better, but very quickly Black was winning.

 

FEN

r2qn2k/p2bbr1p/1p1p4/3Pp1p1/P1PpN3/3B1P2/1P1B2PP/R2Q1RK1 b – – 0 27

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the current European Team Championships.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

1

 

Jones G v Carlsson, PEuropean Team Championships, Batumi, Georgia, October 2019

Solution

1 Bh6! with the idea that if 1…gh, 2 de wins.

2

If Black plays 2…fe, then 3 Rd7 winning the exchange, but also with an overwhelming attack.

FEN

3rnk2/3r1ppQ/4pb1p/1q1P4/1p3BP1/pP1R1B1P/P4PK1/3R4 w – – 0 35

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the current Chess.com Grand Swiss in Douglas, Isle of Man.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Pos175.jpg

 

McShane v Adhiban, Douglas, Isle of Man. October 2019

Solution

I watched the last ten moves or so of this game live, trying to guess Luke’s moves (some times I did, sometimes I didn’t: and he fairly blitzed out the last moves.

1 Rf6! hits the Pg6 which can’t be defended. 1…Rf6 2 Rf6 Re7 3 Rg6+

Pos176.jpg

and the end is near.

 

FEN

2q1r1k1/1p3R2/p2r2p1/4p3/2P1p3/1P6/P5QP/5R1K w – – 0 29

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the current Chess.com Grand Swiss in Douglas, Isle of Man.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Pos173.jpg

 

McShane v Adhiban, Douglas, Isle of Man. October 2019

Solution

The move of the tournament for me, Luke played 1 g4!: scarily opening White’s king side, but Luke correctly judged that Black’s king is the most vulnerable, given Black’s pieces, and especially the queen, are offside.

Pos174.jpg

 

FEN

1qr1r1k1/1p5p/p3p1p1/3p3n/2P1N3/1P6/PQ4PP/3R1R1K w – – 0 23