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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the C.H.O’D. Alexander’s 1973 book”The Penguin Book of Chess Positions”, a book I devoured (and loved) as a child.

I thought I would use it for more of my daily training.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Taimanov Mark E - Petrosian Tigran V (36...Qc7)

 

Taimanov v Petrosian, Candidates Zurich 6th October 1953

 

Solution

1 Rg6+! hg  (1…Bg6 2 Qe6+ Bf7[] 3 Qf6 and Qg7 mate) 2 h7+! Kh7[] 3 Qf7+

Taimanov Mark E - Petrosian Tigran V (39.Qxf7+)

and next 4 Kf2 and the rook swings across to h1: 1-0.

FEN

r5k1/2q1Bb1p/4nQpP/p2pPp2/2pP1P2/2P3R1/6P1/1R4K1 w – – 0 37

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the C.H.O’D. Alexander’s 1973 book”The Penguin Book of Chess Positions”, a book I devoured (and loved) as a child.

I thought I would use it for more of my daily training.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Nyholm Gustaf - Post Ehrhardt (12...c6).jpg

Nyholm v Post, Berlin 1927

Solution

1 Rh6+ and if 1…gh then 2 Qg6+ exploits the pin, check on h6, g5-g6 and mates next move.

So 1…Re8 but 2 Bf7+ crashes through.

Nyholm Gustaf - Post Ehrhardt (14.Bxf7+).jpg

FEN

r1bq1rk1/pp3pp1/2pp3p/n2Bp1P1/4Q3/2P5/PPP2PP1/R1B1K2R w KQ – 0 13

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the C.H.O’D. Alexander’s 1973 book”The Penguin Book of Chess Positions”, a book I devoured (and loved) as a child.

I thought I would use it for more of my daily training.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play: if Black played 1…Kf6, how would White proceed?

Markland Peter Richard - Klundt Klaus (16.Rh3)

 

Peter Markland v Klaus Klundt, Madrid 16th March 1971

Solution

If 1…Kf6, then 2 Ne4+ Ke7[] 3 Nd6[] Kd6 4 Ba3+, attacking from all angles.

Markland Peter Richard - Klundt Klaus (19.Ba3+)

Either the LPDO Rf8 falls off because of the skewer, or the N self-pins 4…Nb4 and it and the rook are lost after 5 Qb3.

FEN

r1b2r2/pp3pp1/2nbp1k1/q5N1/3P4/7R/P4PPP/2BQ1RK1 b – – 0 16

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the C.H.O’D. Alexander’s 1973 book”The Penguin Book of Chess Positions”, a book I devoured (and loved) as a child.

I thought I would use it for more of my daily training.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Markland Peter Richard - Klundt Klaus (15...Kg6)

Peter Markland v Klaus Klundt, Madrid 16th March 1971

Solution

1 Rh3[] threatening Qh5+ Bd7 2 Ne4! 1-0

Markland Peter Richard - Klundt Klaus (17.Ne4)

A deadly final move, hitting the LPDO Bd6, stopping Kf6 and threatening Qg4+ mating.

FEN

r1b2r2/pp3pp1/2nbp1k1/q5N1/3P4/1R6/P4PPP/2BQ1RK1 w – – 0 16

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the C.H.O’D. Alexander’s 1973 book”The Penguin Book of Chess Positions”, a book I devoured (and loved) as a child.
I thought I would use it for more of my daily training.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Markland Peter Richard - Klundt Klaus (12...0-0)

Peter Markland v Klaus Klundt, Madrid 16th March 1971

Solution

The first move is automatic, and the second move needs some calculation.

First, 1 Rb3 Qa5

2 Bh7+ Kh7[] 3 Ng5+ Kg6, the only testing move. If 3…Kg8 4 Qh5 Qf5 5 Rh3 wins.

Markland Peter Richard - Klundt Klaus (15...Kg6)

I’ll give the remaining moves tomorrow, as a further puzzle.

 

FEN

r1b2rk1/pp3ppp/2nbp3/8/3P4/2qB1N2/P4PPP/1RBQ1RK1 w – – 0 13

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the C.H.O’D. Alexander’s 1973 book”The Penguin Book of Chess Positions”, a book I devoured (and loved) as a child.
I thought I would use it for more of my daily training.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play, after Black here played 1…g6

Frydman Paulino - Vidmar Milan Sr (15.Nxd5)

Frydman v Vidmar, Budapest May 1934

 

Solution

1 Ne7+ Qe7[] 2 Bc4 Rc4 3 Bg5 and Vidmar resigned, the pin is lethal.

Frydman Paulino - Vidmar Milan Sr (19.Bg5)

If 3…Kg7 4 Qh6+ Kg8 5 Qh4 Kg7[] 6 Ng4: pins and wins.

 

FEN

2rq1rk1/3bbppp/p3pn2/1p1NN3/2nP1B2/P2BP2Q/1P3PPP/2R2RK1 b – – 0 15

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the C.H.O’D. Alexander’s 1973 book”The Penguin Book of Chess Positions”, a book I devoured (and loved) as a child.I thought I would use it for more of my daily training.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Fischer Robert James - Shocron Ruben (38...Qd8 )

Fischer v Shocron, Mar del Platam 30/3/1959

Solution

1 Re6! because if the rook is captured, White checks on e6 and captures on e5, releasing his black squared bishop into the game.

So 1…Qc8 trying to exploit the pin, but 2 Bd7! breaks it: 2…Qd7 3 Rg6+ discovers on the LPDO Rd7.

Fischer Robert James - Shocron Ruben (40.Bd7!+-).jpg

I have never heard of the player of the black pieces, but it seems he was close to a draw vs Bobby:

Capture.JPG

Megabase has an analysis of the game by Sergei Shipov, and the Chessbase map shows just one slip up let Bobby finish tactically.

FEN

1r1q2k1/4bp1p/2R1n1p1/4p1P1/B1p1P1Q1/2P1B1P1/5PK1/8 w – – 0 39