Skip to content

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s puzzle is a change from the normal, inspired by a tweet by Olimpiu Orcan-see my posting of 7th February 2018.
On an occasional basis I will post a challenge to see if reader’s can spot the games which had particular moves.
 
Puzzle
 
Which famous game had   47…Bh3!!    in it?
Solution
I remember British Chess Magazine deciding that this move was the most amazing move of all time, and even having the position on its envelope at the time. And I also remember being flabbergasted by the move, and not fully understanding why it worked.
Topalov Veselin - Shirov Alexei (47...Bh3!!)
Topalov v Shirov, 4 March 1998

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s puzzle is a change from the normal, inspired by a tweet by Olimpiu Orcan-see my posting of 7th February 2018.
On an occasional basis I will post a challenge to see if reader’s can spot the games which had particular moves.
Puzzle
Which famous game had  29…Bh2??  in it?
Solution
A move which intrigued me as child aged 10 at the time; and still does, almost 50 years later. I assume 29…Bh2?? loses, but have never seen categoric confirmation that it does.
Spassky Boris Vasilievich - Fischer Robert James (29...Bxh2 ) (1)
Spassky v Fischer, game 1, Reykjavik 11.7.1972

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s puzzle is a change from the normal, inspired by a tweet by Olimpiu Orcan-see my posting of 7th February 2018.
On an occasional basis I will post a challenge to see if reader’s can spot the games which had particular moves.
Puzzle
Which famous game had  34 Kg5!!     in it?
Solution
I had to start this series with one of my favourite moves of all time (or, in fact, one of my favourite concepts: Kh2!-g3-f4-g5); played by former club colleague and school mate Nigel Short.
Short Nigel D - Timman Jan H (34.Kg5!)

 

Short v Timman, Tilburg October 1991

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s puzzle is a change from the normal. Inspired by a tweet by Olimpiu Orcan, on an occasional basis I will post a challenge to see if reader’s can spot the games which had particular moves.

Olimpiu

Problem

Which famous game had 23…Qg3!! in it?

Solution

This took me a while: I “knew” it instantly, but couldn’t recall the players’ names, but then remembered Black was Frank Marshall:

Levitsky Stepan Mikhailovich - Marshall Frank James (23...Qg3!)

Levitsky v Marshall, Breslau 20.7.12

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is live blogged whist watching the last round of the Gibraltar Masters. The post is published days in arrears.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

sowesley-deacbogdan-daniel2842...kg829

So v Deac, Gibraltar 31/1/119

 

Solution

Wesley played 1 Rf4 and, at the time of writing, move 47, looks well on the way to victory.

But Alphazero would I suspect go 1 d5 (one of the games of “his” I have seen vs Stockfish has just this motif, d4-d5 to open the diagonal for the black squared bishop) and after 1…ed 2 Bg7!

sowesley-deacbogdan-daniel2844.bxg729

Then if 2…Kg7 3 Rg4+ and White wins the Black Queen either by 3…Qg6 4 Rg6+ or 3…K-f file 4 Rf4+ (or there might even be better moves like a Q check).

sowesley-deacbogdan-daniel2846.rxf42b29

I wonder if we will all ‘up our game’ and learn from Alphazero? My copy of Sadler’s and Regan’s Game Changer book arrived today, and I am looking forward to devouring it.

FEN

1r2r1k1/6p1/1pb1p3/8/2PPqp1R/2B5/5PPQ/5BK1 w – – 0 43

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

Black to play

pos8

Nagy v Rotaru, Rumania 1963

Solution

A hard one, and one I failed on. 1… Rg2+! is the move (I saw it, of course, but didn’t see the follow through). After 2 Rg2[] Rh3:

pos9

Black forces the win of the Q by 3 Nh3 Qd4+; and then either the exchange is lost too, or 4 Rgf2 Qd4 0-1.

pos10

 

 

FEN

6k1/1b3p1p/pp4p1/6r1/3Q1N1q/4r2P/PP3RP1/5RK1 b – – 0 1

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the 1972 book “Chess Combination as a Fine Art”, a book based on articles published in the 1950s-1960s by Kurt Richter.

Since the start of 2018, I have decided to adopt the style of only saying which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

White to play

damjanovicmato-hortvlastimil2836...kh629

Damjanovic v Hort Kecskemet 23/1/1964

Solution

Whte played 1 Nf2 and eventually won. But 1 Rh7+! would have been more efficient: 1…Rh7 2 Nf6 hits the Q, the R, and threatens 2 Qg6 mate. 1…Kh7 2 Nf6+ wins the Q.

damjanovicmato-hortvlastimil2837.rxh72b29

FEN

7R/6rp/3pp2k/1p1qb2P/4NpP1/1P3P2/P1Q3K1/8 w – – 0 37