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Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the January 1979 Chess magazine. I have hundreds (many hundreds) of magazines on my book shelves, and I thought I would dip into them; and thought I would start with going forty years back.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Pos84

Mildenhall v Ardin, Coventry 1978

 

Solution

1 Rf6! Qf6[] 2 Nd5! and if 2…Qb2, a standard mate results: 3 Ne7+ and 4 Qh3 mate.

Pos85

FEN

r2q1rk1/pb3pp1/1p2pb2/2pp4/8/1PN1P1Q1/PBPP2PP/R4RK1 w – – 0 1

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the January 1979 Chess magazine. I have hundreds (many hundreds) of magazines on my book shelves, and I thought I would dip into them; and thought I would start with going forty years back.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Faibisovich Vadim Z - Kaminsky Oleg M (25...Ng5)

Faibisovich v Kaminski, Leningrad 1978

 

Solution

1 Qg5! and Black resigned: 1…fg[] 3 Rh7 g6 and 4 Bf7+ is curtains.

Faibisovich Vadim Z - Kaminsky Oleg M (28.Bxf7+)

FEN

4r1k1/4qrpp/2pp1p2/p3p1nR/Pp2P1Q1/1B1PP2R/1PP3PP/6K1 w – – 0 26

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem was seen very recently in Leonard Barden’s Saturday Financial Times column. It took me a while- half a dog walk- to solve in my head- so I thought it might interest my readers. Hopefully they will do better than me.

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Kociscak Jiri - Tazbir Marcin (34...Qe6)

Kociscak v Tazbir, Czech Republic 1 December 2018

 

Solution

1 Rf8+! Kf8[] is obvious, but for a while I couldn’t see the next move, the key one; so oscillated between 1 Rf8+, 1 Bh6, and other attemps.

2 Bd6+! is the key.

Kociscak Jiri - Tazbir Marcin (36.Bxd6+)

Black resigned.

The key is that the Qe6 is tied to e8 (so as to defend against Qa8+) so the B can’t be captured, and the LPDO Rc7 drops off.

FEN

R4bk1/2r2p1p/3pqPp1/8/2p2B2/5QPP/1P4K1/8 w – – 0 35

 

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the January 1979 Chess magazine. I have hundreds (many hundreds) of magazines on my book shelves, and I thought I would dip into them; and thought I would start with going forty years back.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

 

Regan Kenneth - Shamkovich Leonid Alexandrovic (26...h6)

Regan v Shamkovich, Pasadena 1978

 

Solution

1 Nh6! examine all biffs 1…Nh6 (1…Qh6 2 Rh5 +-) 2 Qe4!

Regan Kenneth - Shamkovich Leonid Alexandrovic (28.Qe4)

2…Nf5[] 3 Rf3 bringing more pieces to the party, and Black must sacrifice his queen, for the game to go on, but he is losing.

Regan Kenneth - Shamkovich Leonid Alexandrovic (29.Rf3)

Black played 3…Qg7 but resigned a few moves later.

FEN

r2r1q1k/pp1b1p2/4p2p/4PnR1/5PN1/2PB4/P3Q1P1/5RK1 w – – 0 27

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the January 1979 Chess magazine. I have hundreds (many hundreds) of magazines on my book shelves, and I thought I would dip into them; and thought I would start with going forty years back.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

Black to play

Janosevic Dragoljub - Petrosian Tigran V (33.Rdd1)

Janosevic v Petrosian, Lone Pine 5th April 1978

Solution

This game was played 41 years ago today.

 

1…Rg1+! and White resigned: the Rf1 is tied to defending f2 so that 2…Nf2 is mate.

Janosevic Dragoljub - Petrosian Tigran V (34...Nf2#)

FEN

6rk/p3p2p/1p2Pp2/2p2P2/2P1nBr1/1P6/P6P/3R1R1K b – – 0 33

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the European Individual Championships.

Dipping into the tournament live on the Follow Chess app (dipping in because I was working that day) I was struck by the pressure Artemiev had in this position, and wondered if was going to convert it. Later, I logged on to see he had, and in style.

Artemiev Vladislav - Hracek Zbynek (15...Qd6).jpg

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Artemiev Vladislav - Hracek Zbynek (20...Qxb2).jpg

Artemiev v Hracek, EIXX 2019 Skopye, 26/3/19

(variation after 20….Qb2)

 

Solution

I had wondered what would have happened if Black had captured on b2.

White would win by 1 Rb1! forcing 1…Qa3, when a discovered attack wins: 2 Ne4! (and not 2 Nd5- no need to improve Black’s Bc6)

Artemiev Vladislav - Hracek Zbynek (22.Ne4!).jpg

If 2…Qe7 3 Nf6+ gf[] 4 Nc6! hits the Q whilst winning a piece.

Tomorrow, my puzzle will be the game finale itself.

FEN

r2b1rk1/1p3ppp/p1b2n2/3pNQB1/3P4/2N1R2P/Pq3PP1/3R2K1 w – – 0 21

Daily Chess Puzzle

Today’s problem is from the European Individual Championships.

Dipping into the tournament live on the Follow Chess app (dipping in because I was working that day) I was struck by the pressure Artemiev had in this position, and wondered if was going to convert it. Later, I logged on to see he had, and in style.

 

As is my custom, I only say which side is to play: and not giving an idea if the move wins or otherwise, unless on occasion I think signposting would be helpful. Instead, the problems are posed with the instruction to decide what you would play, as in a game.

 

White to play

Artemiev Vladislav - Hracek Zbynek (24...Qxb2 +-)

Artemiev v Hracek, EIXX 2019 Skopye, 26/3/19

Solution

1 Rg7!! “obvious”, but the continuation isn’t; 1….Kg7[] 2 Rg7+ Kh8[] 3 Nd5!! fabulous!

Artemiev Vladislav - Hracek Zbynek (27.Nxd5!!)

3…Nd5 4 Bh6 and Black is curiously- or, at first, I found it curious, helpless. The main point is that if 3 Bh6 Rg8 defends, after 4 Rg8+ Ng8[]; the insertion of 3 Nd5 drags the defender away.

In the game, Black played 4…Bf6 and resigned after 5 Qf6+!

Artemiev Vladislav - Hracek Zbynek (29.Qxf6+)

Artemiev is clearly a player on the road to greatness.

 

FEN

r2bbr1k/1p3ppp/p4n2/3pNQ2/3P1B2/P1NR2RP/1q3PP1/6K1 w – – 0 25